Quantum Computing

IBM Q: The future is quantum

QISKit for quantum computation

Current quantum computation efforts are the result of a long history of scientific achievements. The initial formulation of quantum mechanics in the 1920s and 30s gave us a fundamentally new understanding of the natural world. By the 70s, it was understood that this paradigm shift can also have implications for the way we compute. This […]

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Now Open: Get quantum ready with new scientific prizes for professors, students and developers

Submissions for the IBM Q Prizes are now open: IBM Q Awards website. Whether its PCs, smartphones or quantum computers, one fact remains consistent: the recipe for success relies heavily on building an engaged and thriving ecosystem. For example, on 12 August 1981 when IBM introduced the IBM 5150 (eventually called the IBM PC) at […]

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Approximate quantum computing: from advantage to applications

Photo by IBM Fellow Charles Bennett Last week at our third Think Q conference at the Thomas J Watson Research Center, industry and academic leaders in quantum computing met to tackle questions about how to bridge the divide between the theory of quantum algorithms and practical applications that can run on today’s approximate (non-fault tolerant) […]

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What’s in a qubit?

Would a carrier of information, by any other physical phenomenon, be as powerful? Over the last few months, we’ve shared some videos from members of our research team explaining key concepts in quantum computing. We told you about superposition, entanglement, and quantum algorithms. And we took you behind the scenes and into our lab, in […]

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The future is quantum

Some of the most important technical advances of the 20th century were enabled by decades of fundamental scientific exploration, whose initial purpose was simply to extend human understanding. When Einstein discovered relativity, he had no idea that one day it would be an important part of modern navigation systems. Such is the story of quantum […]

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Quantum Computing: Breaking Through the 49 Qubit Simulation Barrier

Quantum computing is at the threshold of tackling important problems that cannot be efficiently or practically computed by other, more classical means. Getting past this threshold will require us to build, test and operate reliable quantum computers with 50 or more qubits. Achieving this potential will require major leaps forward in both science and engineering. […]

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How to measure a molecule’s energy using a quantum computer

Editor’s note: This article is by Abhinav Kandala, Antonio Mezzacapo, and Kristan Temme, IBM Research Simulating molecules on quantum computers just got much easier with IBM’s superconducting quantum hardware. In a recent research article published in Nature, Hardware-efficient Variational Quantum Eigensolver for Small Molecules and Quantum Magnets, we implement a new quantum algorithm capable of […]

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Quantum Computing: you know it’s cool, now find out how it works

You have probably heard all the buzzwords people use when trying to explain quantum computing (superposition and entanglement ring a bell?). Fans of xkcd – “the webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language” – already know that when a subject is both philosophically exciting and mathematically complex, it’s easy to develop weird ideas about it, […]

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Increase your quantum IQ

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you probably know about the 5-qubit quantum computer that we put online last year, which you and general public are free to access through the IBM Cloud. Maybe you didn’t think much of it, given that lots of cutting edge technology is now accessible through the cloud. But […]

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A funny thing happened on my way to Maker Faire

Normally on Friday mornings, I’d be winding my way up a canyon in the hills south of San Jose to IBM Research – Almaden, where I work as an advisory engineer and scientist for our research in magnetoelectonics, spintronics and related fields. Instead, thanks to an amazing confluence of my IBM work and my outside […]

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A quantum experience at Maker Faire

Replay: A Beginner’s Guide to Quantum Computing Dr. Talia Gershon at Maker Faire Bay Area 2017 ###This article was updated on May 31, 2017### We are taking our new 16 qubit quantum processor on the road, to the Bay Area Maker Faire, from May 19-21. I’ll be there, along with 15-20 other IBMers from our […]

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Quantum’s advantage solves black box bit riddle

How IBM Q learns parity with noise Quantum theory met practice in the Nature Quantum Information paper, “Demonstration of quantum advantage in machine learning” when colleagues at IBM Research and I collaborated with scientists at Raytheon BBN to demonstrate one of the first proven examples of a quantum computer’s advantage over a classical computer. By […]

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