IBM Research Europe

AI helps explain your microbiome

Newly published research describes an Explainable AI to help understand the link between skin microbiome composition and personal wellbeing.

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Atomic force microscopy helps clear the haze surrounding Saturn’s moon Titan

We have unveiled in the laboratory new details on how the famous Titan haze may have formed and what its chemical make-up looks like. Our findings in the latest issue of the Astrophysical Journal detail how we've resolved molecules of different sizes, giving snapshots of the different stages through which molecules grow to build up the haze.

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Silicon waveguides move us closer to faster computers that use light

Our Zurich-based team of researchers has just managed to efficiently guide visible light through a silicon wire – an important milestone towards faster, more efficient integrated circuits. Our low-loss silicon waveguide could enable new photonic chip designs for applications that rely on visible light, and could lead to more efficient lasers and modulators used in telecoms.

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Light and in-memory computing help AI achieve ultra-low latency

Ever noticed that annoying lag that sometimes happens during the internet streaming from, say, your favorite football game? Called latency, this brief delay between a camera capturing an event and the event being shown to viewers is surely annoying during the decisive goal at a World Cup final. But it could be deadly for a […]

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Hybrid clouds will rely on magnetic tape for decades to come

New IBM, Fujifilm prototype breaks world record, delivers record 27X more areal density than today’s tape drives

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European Research Council funds research into single-molecule devices by atom manipulation

A team formed by IBM Research scientist Dr. Leo Gross, University Regensburg professor Dr. Jascha Repp, and University Santiago de Compostela professor Dr. Diego Peña Gil has received a European Research Center (ERC) Synergy Grant for their project “Single Molecular Devices by Atom Manipulation” (MolDAM).

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Adversarial Robustness Toolbox: One Year Later with v1.4

One year ago, IBM Research published the first major release of the  Adversarial Robustness Toolbox (ART) v1.0, an open-source Python library for machine learning (ML) security. ART v1.0 marked a milestone in AI Security by extending unified support of adversarial ML beyond deep learning towards conventional ML models and towards a large variety of data types […]

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Using machine learning to solve a dense hydrogen conundrum

Hydrogen is the simplest element in the universe, yet its behavior in extreme conditions such as very high pressure and temperature is still far from being well understood. Dense hydrogen constitutes the bulk of the content of giant gas planets and brown dwarf stars and it’s a material of interest for both fundamental physics and […]

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RoboRXN: Automating Chemical Synthesis

For most of us, chemistry is a distant childhood memory that takes us back to our school days where we got to experiment with chemical reactions. I mean who didn’t love the school science fair? It was the one occasion we were allowed to make a mess in the kitchen by mixing baking soda, vinegar, […]

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Teleporting Memory Across Two Servers

What if I told you that it’s possible to teleport memory from one server and attach it to another server, without entering the datacenter building? You would probably: a) think you’re dreaming of a Star Trek episode; b) or better yet, think this is really cool and you could use it to improve the efficiency […]

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Homomorphic Encryption Comes to Linux on IBM Z 

For decades, society has benefitted from modern cryptography to protect our sensitive data during transmission and at rest. It seems daily that we see news about data breaches, privacy lapses, and inadvertent disclosures of information. In a real sense data privacy has gone from boardroom discussion a decade ago, to dinner table discussion. For IBM […]

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Programming microfluidic functionalities in real-time with virtual channels

Work by our group at IBM Research Europe in Zurich has led to a new method for the rapid implementation of microfluidic operations. By tailoring the potential landscape inside a flow cell, we form so-called “virtual channels” on demand to perform high-precision guiding and transport, splitting, merging and mixing of microfluidic flows. This allows to […]

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