Quantum Computing

IBM Roundtable: Building a Quantum Workforce Requires Interdisciplinary Education and the Promise of Real Jobs

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The ability to harness quantum-mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement to perform computation obviously poses a number of difficulties. Add in the need to make these systems perform meaningful work, and you’ve raised the stakes considerably. Creating a pipeline of talented, well-trained academics and professionals who can meet those challenges was the subject of IBM’s July 28 virtual roundtable, “How to Build a Quantum Workforce.”

The roundtable’s panel of experts from IBM Research, Howard University, New York University and Forrester Research discussed digital learning’s role in accelerating quantum skills-building and the interdisciplinary skillsets essential for a career in quantum computing. They also addressed the need to avoid hype when promoting quantum computing’s potential, balanced against the need to attract and retain talent that could pursue potentially more lucrative careers on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley.

Read more about the panel, and the IBM Quantum Educators program in the IBM Newsroom, and watch the entire discussion, here:

IBM Quantum

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