Quantum Computing

Announcing the IBM Quantum Challenge

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The IBM Quantum Challenge
Begins: May 4 at 9:00 a.m. US Eastern
Ends: May 8 at 8:59:59 a.m. US Eastern
Take the challenge: ibm.co/quantumchallenge

On May 4, 2016, our team introduced the first quantum computer that could be programmed over the cloud, using IBM Quantum Experience. We wanted everyone to be able to experience a quantum computer, even individuals without access to an academic research lab.

Today, we have 18 quantum systems and counting available to our clients and community. Over 200,000 users, including more than 100 IBM Q Network client partners, have joined us to conduct fundamental research on quantum information science, develop the applications of quantum computing in various industries, and educate the future quantum workforce. Additionally, 175 billion quantum circuits have been executed using our hardware, resulting in more than 200 publications by researchers around the world.

In addition to developing quantum hardware, we have also been driving the development of powerful open source quantum software. Qiskit, written primarily in Python, has grown to be a popular quantum computing software development kit with several novel features, many of which were contributed by dedicated Qiskitters.

Thank you to everyone who has joined us on this exciting journey building the largest and most diverse global quantum computing community.

The IBM Quantum Challenge

As we approach the fourth anniversary of the IBM Quantum Experience, we invite you to celebrate with us by completing a challenge with four exercises. Whether you are already a member of the community, or this challenge is your first quantum experiment, these four exercises will improve your understanding of quantum circuits. We hope you also have fun as you put your skills to test.

The IBM Quantum Challenge begins at 9:00 a.m. US Eastern on May 4, and ends 8:59:59 a.m. US Eastern on May 8. To take the challenge, visit https://quantum-computing.ibm.com/challenges.

In recognition of everyone’s participation, we are awarding digital badges and providing additional sponsorship to the Python Software Foundation.

Continued investment in quantum education

Trying to explain quantum computing without resorting to incorrect analogies has always been a goal for our team. As a result, we have continuously invested in education, starting with opening access to quantum computers, and continuing to create tools that enable anyone to program them. Notably, we created the first interactive open source textbook in the field.

As developers program quantum computers, what they are really doing is building and running quantum circuits. To support your learning about quantum circuits:

  • Read the Qiskit textbook chapter where we define quantum circuits as we understand them today. Dive in to explore quantum computing principles and learn how to implement quantum algorithms on your own.
  • Watch our newly launched livelectures called “Circuit Sessions,” or get started programming a quantum computer by watching “Coding with Qiskit.” Subscribe to the Qiskit YouTube channel to watch these two series and more.

The future of quantum is in open source software and access to real quantum hardware—let’s keep building together.


 

IBM Quantum

Quantum starts here

 

IBM Fellow and Vice President, IBM Quantum

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