Commentary / Opinion

IoT weekly round-up: Thursday 25th January 2018

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This week, we’re delighted that IBM’s CEO Ginni Rometty is one of the chairs of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Elsewhere, Facebook and Element AI announce new artificial intelligence endeavours, and GM turns its attentions to autonomous driving tech.

Davos forum chaired entirely by women

This is a big one – the World Economics Forum in Davos, Switzerland will be chaired entirely by women. That’s a first in its 48-year history. We’re absolutely delighted that IBM CEO Ginni Rometty is one of them. Her co-chair is Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg. Join the conversation on Twitter with the tag #WEF18.

Facebook welcomes new head of AI research

Facebook has hired a new executive to lead its AI research (FAIR) team. Jérôme Pesenti (formerly chief scientist for big data at IBM, so he must be good) will be leading the division’s 130 employees. The plan is to scale up rapidly, doubling the size of its research team in Paris to 100 people by 2022.

Element AI opens London outpost to support its ‘AI for good’ mission

More on AI, as Canadian startup Element AI announces plans to open an outpost in London. Last year, the group raised $102 million to launch new artificial intelligence services and systems. One of the new outpost’s focal projects will be ‘AI for good’ – working with charities and NGOs on AI tools to help everyone. Element AI also develops services for finance, manufacturing, robotics and logistics. The initial plan is to recruit around 20 engineers and developers for the London office.

GM launches tech center in Canada for autonomous driving

Automaker GM has opened a new dedicated tech facility in Canada. The Canadian Technical Centre (CTC) will support its work on autonomous vehicles, infotainment and advanced driver assistance features. It will house some 1,000 employees, 700 of whom will be dedicated engineers. The team will be working on technologies that support safe driving (in both cars with drivers and autonomous vehicles), such as lane-keeping.

Apple’s Health Records feature lets you view medical records on your iPhone

Apple have announced a new Health Records section in their Health app, letting you view your medical records on your iPhone. The new feature forms part of iOS 11.3 and is currently in beta testing. Some hospitals and clinics are already partnering with Apple on this new initiative. The idea is to let patients add any CDA (Clinical Document Architecture) file to the Health Data section of the Health app. Johns Hopkins Medicine and Penn Medicine are already testing Health Records with their patients.

Keep up-to-date with the connected world

Bookmark the IoT weekly round-up series page to keep up with what’s going on in the wider world of IoT.

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