Security

New IoT security podcast series

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This five part podcast series examines the facts that should be considered by individuals and companies when building and deploying IoT devices and solutions. Hosted by Diana Kelley, Global Executive Security Adviser, each week a panel of IBM security experts, including Tim Hahn, Distinguished Engineer, Chief Architect IoT security; Andras Szakal, VP, CTO for IBM Watson US Federal and James Murphy, Offering Manager IoT Security share their opinions and insights about the industry.

Devices operate in hostile environments

The first podcast tackles how IoT devices often operate without human supervision and they must therefore be rugged and resistant to physical tampering. Without human involvement, they much be able to recover from an attack and fail safely.

Software security degrades over time

The second podcast allows the panel to discuss how managing software updates is always a challenge, but additional difficulties arise when IoT is involved. Ensuring software stays up-to-date for IoT devices can become a never-ending task. The risk of attack continues to increases with the length of time your connected car or smart refrigerator remains in service.

Shared secrets don’t remain secret

The third podcast states how millions of IoT devices come preloaded with identical passwords. Those who choose to leave their passwords as the default settings may be sharing their data with hordes of strangers and leaving their devices vulnerable.

Weak configurations persist

The penultimate podcast looks at how changing the default configurations of an IoT device takes thought and effort, and unfortunately for this reason, it doesn’t happen. Device manufacturers should make security options mandatory to change by default or as part of an initial setup process when the end user first receives the device.

As data accumulates, exposure issues increase

The final podcast emphasizes how IoT devices are continuously collecting huge amounts of personal and sensitive data. The Thing that the data represents can vary from a human, a building or even a car and many more. The data pertaining to these Things can be very specific such as heart rate or GPS locations. All of these factors mean that there are significant privacy and security challenges that need to be considered in the IoT.

Learn more

  • You can listen to the podcasts in full here, or take a look at the infographic.
  • To learn more about how IBM can help your organization improve its security environment and take advantage of IoT technology visit our website or to see more on IoT and security, visit here.
  • To read further about how to protect and clean out your data for better security, head to this blog.

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