Customs & Border Management

Big and surprising shifts in the competitiveness of countries as trading nations – World Bank Logistics Performance Indicator (LPI) 2014 report

The yearly WCO IT conference will take place in Brisbane, Australia, on 5-7 May 2014. In preparation of this event, which has a strong focus on sharing best practices and innovations, it is interesting to review the World Bank Logistics Performance Indicator (LPI) 2014 report which has recently been published.

Big and surprising shifts in the competitiveness of countries as trading nations are revealed in this report.

The World Bank LPI (Logistics Performance Indicator) report 2014 provides the latest insights on how competitive every nation is for trade. Customs is one of the main pillar determining the competitiveness. Other pillars are the logistics competence, tracking & tracing capabilities and more.

Some key conclusions:

  • Europe is doing very well, with big improvements in Germany, The Netherlands, The UK and Norway.
  • We can expect heavy investments in Singapore, that is not likely to accept its big decline in the ranking.
  • North America is lagging behind: some decline in the US, mixed results in Canada

Read about the position of your client before going to meet your client – demonstrate that you know the strength and weaknesses of your client and its relative positioning compared to competing trading nations!

For example:

  • Germany scores #1 overall, and #2 in Customs. A big improvement since the last report in 2012 (#4 overall, #6 in customs)
  • The Netherlands scores #2 overall, and #4 in Customs. A great improvement since the last report (#5 overall, #8 in customs)
  • Belgium scores #3 overall, and #11 in Customs. In previous report Belgium scored #7 both as overall ranking and in customs
  • The UK scores #4 overall, and #5 in Customs, a great improvement since the last report (#10 on both)
  • Singapore scores #5 overall, and #3 in Customs. Big disappointment. In the previous report Singapore scored #1 overall and #1 in customs. Singapore is likely to react to this decline with heavy investments.
  • Sweden scores #6 overall, and #15 in Customs. (#13 and #12 respectively in the previous report)
  • Norway scores #7 overall, and #1 (!!!) in Customs.
  • The US scores #9 overall, and #16 in Customs. (#9 and #13 respectively in the previous report)
  • Canada scores #12 overall, and #20 in Customs. (#14 and #17 respectively in the previous report)

Read the full report here: http://lpi.worldbank.org/sites/default/files/LPI_Report_2014.pdf

Find more information here: http://lpi.worldbank.org/

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