service-management

Special clouds for special needs: High Performance Computing Clouds

Today, we are used to speaking about desktop or test clouds, or maybe moving our email or CRM to cloud-based solutions. What do all these workloads have in common? They have some of the main characteristics to be a good candidate for cloud computing, but beyond that, they all are related to enterprise workloads with low or non-predictable demand for computing resources, do not generate a significant amount of data during application run, and are loosely coupled to the infrastructure.

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CIOs, are your applications on cloud nine?

Being on cloud nine refers to a state of extreme happiness. As a CIO, wouldn’t you be happy if your team supplied IT services demanded by your users, that were always available when needed and at an optimized cost?

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Do you have a self-healing cloud?

Recently, a business analyst shared her organization’s experience replacing its Human Resources (HR) application. She went on to tell me that the “Cloud HR application was self-healing.” I was amused with her statement and asked her to explain it.

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Where are your images and what do they contain?

In the “Rapid deployments with IBM SmartCloud Provisioning” blog entry, we have shown that virtual machines or appliances can be started and configured in a matter of seconds. It has never been so easy to create a virtual machine (VM), install software, and configure middleware. However, with great power comes great responsibility…it is now possible to create a VM, but what is its lifecycle? Will it be destroyed after being used, is the starting image deprecated, or is there a better starting image given the needed configuration and software install requirements?

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Tips for virtual desktop performances

In my last blog entry I wrote the following statement: “Always be sure to consider any user objections before deploying desktop virtualization and thin client technology.” One of the main objections is loss of performance.

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Cloud computing at Pulse 2012 pre-conference

This year at IBM Software conference Pulse 2012, being held March 4-7, cloud computing has its own track of sessions to show client success and new innovations around cloud computing.

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Keeping the cloud switched on using recovery-oriented computing

There are several factors that have an impact on the availability of services, mostly related to infrastructure failures. Failures are not only related to unrecoverable hardware outages, but also to recoverable OS or middleware failures.

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Tivoli Service Automation Manager 7.2.2 makes life easier for cloud service providers

In my previous blog posts (“Does IBM use cloud?” and “Transforming a local economy with cloud computing”), I described two cloud computing solutions that take advantage of Tivoli Service Automation Manager to automate service delivery. As mentioned by Marcela Adan in her blog post “Integrated service management for cloud: The heart of the IBM Cloud […]

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ITIL and cloud series: Service design for cloud implementation

Your business is changing and you verified cloud computing as a possible solution. You have defined your strategy, formed a vision and a roadmap to realize it, and decided on the service and deployment models to start with. Now you need to focus on the design of your cloud implementation and you need consultants and architects, helping you with the base of good practices and proven architectures.

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ITIL and cloud (Part 1): ITIL 2011 speaks about cloud computing. Is this enough?

Note: Through the end of the year, we’ll be posting one blog per day from our top 10 “greatest hits” from Thoughts on Cloud since we launched in September. This post is #7 and was originally published on Sept. 30.

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ITIL and cloud series: Cloud for strategy and strategy for cloud

With this and the next blog I would like to stimulate your thinking around the cloud service strategy and cloud service design phases, and also describe some of the experiences we've had and methodology that we normally use with clients.

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ITIL and cloud series: Beyond the books, ITIL value and cloud implications

In my previous blog, “ITIL 2011 speaks about cloud computing. Is this enough?” I reported how the recent 2011 version of ITIL speaks about cloud computing and realized we definitely need to try to go beyond the official books. With this and future blogs I will try to contribute with some ideas and statements, which are my own and not necessarily best practices.

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