Cognitive

US Army Logistics extends cloud contract and adds Watson

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Army Logistics IBM CloudThe US Army’s Logistics Support Activity has extended a cloud computing agreement with IBM first inked in 2012 for an additional three years. The new $135 million contract will include Watson capabilities in addition to they cloud services and software the Army was already using.

“We’re moving beyond infrastructure as a service and embracing both platform and software as a service, adopting commercial cloud capabilities to further enhance Army readiness,” said LOGSA Commander Col. John Kuenzli. Cognitive computing and analytics are of particular interest, Kuenzli said.

The Army’s Logistics Support Activity uses cloud computing to manage hundreds of military bases and other facilities, as well as coordinate the movements of thousands of people and vehicles. Watson will help analyze some 5 billion points of sensor data from jeeps, drones and other military assets to help with predictive maintenance. The Army and IBM initially successfully tested IBM cognitive capabilities on 10 percent of the Army Stryker vehicle fleet.

For more about LOGSA renewing its cloud contract with IBM, check out Nextgov‘s full article.

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