Infrastructure

Why true cloud adoption is increasingly important

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True cloud adoptionRecently, I have noticed that the subject of cloud conversations I have with clients has shifted. They are moving away from asking “How do I start with cloud?” and focusing more on this request: “We have cloud; help us adopt and make full use of it.”

Cloud adoption is important and can be easily overlooked. By fully adopting cloud, it becomes second nature and no longer a “special” environment. It’s a fully integrated part of an organization’s IT landscape.

Often the hardest part of the cloud journey is deciding to take the first steps, such as identifying those first workloads and committing to the first cloud implementation. But like many first-of-a-kind projects, it’s not always smooth sailing. Further help and support can be required to avoid pitfalls or even project failure.

Along with the shift in a client’s focus from first steps to adoption, my role, and that of many of my colleagues, has also moved to cloud adoption and helping clients find success in their first cloud projects.

What does this mean in practice? As a cloud adoption leader, I work with clients and IBM project teams to ensure that cloud projects create the business outcomes they were designed to deliver. I provide cloud expertise and a means to engage with a range of technical experts, as well as support services within IBM who may be needed to fix and unblock issues which might otherwise lead to a cloud project stalling or even failing.

For example, I have been involved with a client project in which there were questions about how to implement the client’s security model in the cloud. This was threatening to cause delays. Once I was aware of the problem, I quickly hooked the project team up with the right security and configuration experts within IBM Cloud. They worked together to build a security model that met client requirements and the project stayed on track.

Successful adoption is not just about fixing problems, though. It’s also about keeping abreast of changes to cloud services and launching new features that might enhance or provide further transformation. Talking to clients about changes and new features is key to spread awareness and identify where changes might affect an in-flight project. This promotes a culture of proactive decision making, as well as continual enhancement and improvement, especially where projects are agile can take advantage of change.

It’s an exciting time to be around cloud computing. An ever-increasing number of organizations are adopting a “cloud-first” approach, and overall, cloud computing has arguably become the norm rather than just a consideration for even the most complex workloads.

Accordingly, IBM is expanding its efforts to help clients be successful in their cloud adoption journey. I’m proud to be just one of a myriad of experts working with clients on such projects today.

See the latest in multi-cloud management at InterConnect.

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