Infrastructure

PeroxyChem builds a whole new IT infrastructure in less than five months

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PrintWhat sounds like a problem to some companies represents an opportunity for others.

When PeroxyChem was divested from its parent company in 2014, the chemical manufacturer was given just one year to create a new IT infrastructure and department while maintaining day-to-day business functions.

40 percent management, 60 percent innovation

When Jim Curley took over as chief information officer (CIO), PeroxyChem had 11 months to create a new IT environment and migrate all necessary data and applications, SAP and non-SAP. For Curley, setting up a new infrastructure wasn’t just about maintaining the status quo and avoiding downtime. It was also about making the right decision for the future.

“We went in knowing we didn’t want to re-implement anything new or change the application landscape,” he said, “but we did want a cloud infrastructure because we needed transparency on the cost implications for future acquisitions or divestitures.”

Curley’s vision for the new IT department included one critical goal: IT personnel would spend only 40 percent of their time on IT management tasks that “keep the lights on,” and the remaining 60 percent on strategic projects to propel the business forward. Additionally, the company did not have the time or resources required to hire and train new personnel to only manage the day-to-day operations of the environment.

A new, more strategic IT environment

With six months remaining, PeroxyChem selected IBM to set up and host the company’s new environment with a managed cloud infrastructure. By collaborating with IBM, PeroxyChem completed the project with weeks to spare.

PeroxyChem now has a flexible environment that can scale to support its high growth requirements and workload peaks. The deployment includes service level agreements (SLAs) for high input/output requirements and standardization that helps reduce the complexity of the SAP landscape.

By adopting an IBM managed cloud hosting solution, Curley and his team achieved their goal of spending less time on maintenance and more time on innovation.

“Certainly, that wouldn’t be the case if we had not gone with the cloud and outsourced what we did,” he said. “That has translated to our being able to start up our IT business steering committee and have, on average, five business-related projects going on at any given point in time. We’re hitting the dates we give for project completions because we’re not having to do that production support and maintenance work.”

Learn more about how a managed cloud hosting solution for SAP (and non-SAP) applications can free up your resources for a more strategic approach to IT with IBM Cloud Managed Services.

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