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Why would a cloud expert be interested in a new DevOps tool?

ADDI cloud expert DevOps toolI have been working on cloud infrastructures since before the hype over cloud computing.

I have watched as the cloud matured from just being a way to get cheap Linux instances into a set of services that are literally changing the way we deliver IT forever. I have also witnessed the challenges enterprises face when moving their apps to the cloud and I am always looking for ways to make the migration easier.

As someone who has devoted the last 20 years to helping people create an increasingly adaptable IT infrastructure through new technologies, I can say I am fired up about our new Application Discovery and Delivery Intelligence (ADDI) product. You might wonder why a dyed-in-the-wool IT guy would be so chuffed about a new DevOps tool, but the answer is simple: this DevOps tool is precisely what enterprises need to find the powerful building blocks for their new, born-in-the-cloud applications.

Taking big apps to the cloud

Most IT shops have huge, monolithic applications. These applications have been refined over decades to provide functionality that gives their businesses an advantage over competitors.

While these applications have served businesses for decades, they don’t offer the flexibility people have come to expect from applications born in the cloud. Many companies want to rewrite these applications to make them compatible with born-in-the-cloud applications, but such rewrites are expensive, take time and introduce risk.

What companies need right now is the ability to break those huge, monolithic applications into their component parts. Those parts can be reused by born-in-the-cloud applications without having to go through the time, expense and risk of rewriting. This is a tremendous opportunity for corporations to take their business advantage to the cloud. The real trick now is to figure out which components in those monolithic applications are ripe for the picking to become the cloud services that businesses need.

Why ADDI?

This is where ADDI comes into play. This new tool helps businesses find the components that will be the cloud services of the future. It identifies the services which can easily become cloud services. It shows the dependencies that allow developers to understand how data flows and how data is managed through an application. It provides businesses with the intelligence needed to find the core services buried in their current applications so they can be unleashed for consumption by born-on-the-cloud applications.

Now you see why this cloud guy is really pumped about having a tool that enables businesses to build a path from their traditional IT environments to modern cloud environments without dismantling the current ones or rewriting everything.

ADDI provides enterprises with the ability to bring traditional IT assets into the 21st century world of cloud. This DevOps tool makes it easy to create new, enterprise-capable cloud applications in days instead of months. It’s DevOps product that can literally change the way businesses consume their IT services; that’s what excites this cloud guy most.

Learn more about IBM Application Discovery and Delivery Intelligence.

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