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Become an IBM Certified Solution Advisor – Cloud Computing Architecture

Note: For the past two weeks, we have posted our top 10 posts of 2012. This post is #1, and was originally published on May 25, 2012. Thanks for following our top 10 series! 

Here’s your chance to get certified in the latest cloud certification program from IBM. Test “000-281: Foundations of IBM Cloud Computing Architecture V2” gives you the certification designation of IBM Certified Solution Advisor – Cloud Computing Architecture V2. This certification is one of two cloud-related certifications from IBM. The other, which is ”Test 000-280: IBM Cloud Computing Infrastructure Architect V1,”  leads to the certification designation of  IBM Certified Solution Architect – Cloud Computing Infrastructure V1.

In this blog post, I cover the details of the first certification, (000-281 – Foundations of IBM Cloud Computing Architecture V2).

Certification name: 000-281: Foundations of IBM Cloud Computing Architecture V2

Test Information:

Number of questions: 50

Time allowed in minutes: 90

Required passing score: 68%

Test languages: English

Website:  http://www-03.ibm.com/certify/tests/ovr281.shtml

Designation after completing the certification: IBM Certified Solution Advisor – Cloud Computing Architecture V2

Certification cost: $200 in USA ($100 in India) if you apply through external Prometric vendor. Costs vary by location, so check the Prometric website to get the actual costs for your geography. For IBM employees, Business Partners, and IBM partnered universities and colleges, you might get discounted rates. Be sure to check with your local contacts and local IBM websites for details.

Note for IBM employees: The cost of the exam is fully reimbursable on passing. This is a PRIME certification and should be applied preferably through your local IBM Learning and Knowledge (LnK) center or tool.

How to apply:  Through Prometric, or through your local LnK center at IBM premises (if you are an IBM employee).

Pre-requisites: Although some sort of working knowledge of cloud environment helps, even a basic understanding of cloud principles will do.

How to prepare: The questions are based on the following three broad sections:

  • Section 1: Cloud Computing Concepts and Benefits
  • Section 2: Cloud Computing Design Principles
  • Section 3: IBM Software Architecture

You will need to study thoroughly by following the details given in the objectives.

Resources:

  • Test preparation: web resources, e-books and white papers
  • Take a free sample test for this certification to test your preparedness
  • Excellent resources to start with if you are completely new to cloud

References:

  • IBM certification policy, including information about retaking a test
  • Why get certified? See the values that you as an individual and your organization get by being certified in products and solutions
  • Access your current and previous IBM certification history, request e-certificates, order premium quality paper certificates and much more, all in one place

I believe this information can help you get started for the exam. Of course, I will be happy to answer any further queries.

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