How-tos

Get started guides for your favorite runtimes

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For many developers, the Hello World starter applications on Bluemix are too basic and the sample applications on IBM-Bluemix.github.io page are a bit too advanced. If you agree with this, you’ll find our recently released Runtime Getting Started Guides extremely helpful.

These new guides will take you through the steps to get started on Bluemix with the help of a sample application. In 10 minutes or less, you’ll learn to:

  1. Set up a development environment
  2. Download sample code
  3. Run the application locally
  4. Run the application on Bluemix Cloud Foundry
  5. Add a Bluemix Database service
  6. Connect to the database from your local application

getting started with runtimes

Once you have these steps down, you’ll be on your way to building your next cool app on Bluemix Cloud!

The sample application asks the user for their name. If the application is not connected to a database, it responds with “Hello <name>”. Once the application is connected to a database, it replies with “Hello <name>! I’ve added you to the database” and then saves the name to the database. It also shows the list of names already in the database. It’s a great starter app that you can build on to create your next app.

Connecting to databases

The code was written to be SIMPLE, to enable new developers to get up to speed quickly and with ease. Guides are available in Java, Node.js, PHP, Python Go, Ruby, ASP.NET Core and Swift so you can get started with the runtime of your choice.

Every sample comes with a popular web application framework for that language, an SDK to interact with the DB, sample code to read database credentials from a local configuration file when running locally, and code to read VCAP_SERVICES when running on Bluemix. If you are unsure about what some of these things mean, don’t worry – the getting started guides will explain it and clear up any confusion.

Java – Liberty
A Java EE application that uses JAX-RS to provide a REST API to receive requests from the UI. The API then uses the java-cloudant client library to persist the visitor names to a Cloudant database.
Getting Started with Java Guide

Node.js

A Node.js application that use express framework to provide a REST API to receive requests from the UI. The API then uses the node-cfenv package to read database credentials and nodejs-cloudant client library to persist the visitor names to a Cloudant database.
Getting Started with Node Guide

Swift

A server-side Swift application that use kitura framework to provide a REST API to receive requests from the UI. The API then uses the swift-cloudant client library to persist the visitor names to a Cloudant database.
Getting Started with Swift Guide

ASP.NET Core

A ASP.NET Core application that provides a REST API which receives requests from the UI. The API then uses Entity Framework Core to persist the visitor names to a MySQL database.
Getting Started ASP.NET Guide

PHP

A PHP application that use slim framework to provide a REST API that receives requests from the UI. The API then uses the sag client library to persist the visitor names to a Cloudant database.
Getting Started with PHP Guide

Java Tomcat

A Java EE application that uses JAX-RS to provide a REST API to receive requests from the UI. The API then uses the java-cloudant client library to persist the visitor names to a Cloudant database.
Getting Started with Tomcat Guide

Go

A Go application that uses Gin framework to provide a REST API to receive requests from the UI. The API then uses the go-couchdb client library to persist the visitor names to a Cloudant database.
Getting Started with Go Guide

Ruby

A Ruby application that uses Rails to provide a REST API to receive requests from the UI. The API then uses the couchrest client library to persist the visitor names to a Cloudant database.
Getting Started with Ruby Guide

Python

A Python application that uses Flask to provide a REST API to receive requests from the UI. The API then uses the pythong-cloudant client library to persist the visitor names to a Cloudant database.
Getting Started with Python Guide

This is a v1 release of these guides and we plan to continue improving it. We would love feedback. If you have any suggestions or find a defect with the code, please open an issue or submit a Pull Request to the associated repository:

 

IBM Cloud Technical Offering Manager

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