AI/Watson

Clients the stars of World of Watson conference

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World of Watson, the four-day IBM conference held last week in Las Vegas, was packed with cognitive innovation stories and inspiration. A large part of that were the more than 500 IBM clients sharing their real-world experiences with cognitive solutions at conference demonstrations, panel discussions and keynote sessions. Some clients were featured on the main stage, while others shared more in-depth details of their journey in breakout sessions. Even more clients came to learn what might be next for their business. All were generous with their time and sharing the insights they’ve learned. Some of my favorite client stories from the conference demonstrate the variety that Watson is capable of producing and span across widely different industries.

Watson in automotive

While at World of Watson, General Motors and IBM announced the launch of OnStar Go. It’s the auto industry’s first cognitive mobility platform, which will be available in GM cars starting in early 2017. GM CEO Mary Barra shared that the company aims to make the 46 minutes the average driver spends in the car each day more productive and more enjoyable with this new cognitive tool. With the customer’s consent, Watson will learn the driver’s preferences, apply machine learning and sift through data to recognize patterns in their decisions and habits. This information will then enable individualized location-based interactions specific to each unique driver, making their driving experience more enjoyable and productive. See the interactive press release to learn more about OnStar Go and see demo videos.

Watson in healthcare

Doctors at the University of Tokyo are using Watson to help diagnose cancer patients. Professor Satoru Miyano, who runs the Human Genome Center at the University of Tokyo, shared how his team is mapping patient genomes to best treat these patients. Doctors are using the cognitive capabilities of Watson to more quickly and accurately identify the one mutation making a patient sick from among the thousands to millions of mutated genes commonly found in a patient. Once identified, doctors can better diagnose and prescribe treatment. In one patient case that Professor Miyano shared, a leukemia patient, who was previously unresponsive to treatments, was successfully diagnosed by Watson. The successful diagnosis helped doctors to successfully treat the patient. Read more about Watson’s role in this University of Tokyo patient case.

Watson in song

We also heard from Alex Da Kid, a Grammy-winning producer, about using Watson to create music. First, Watson analyzed text from the web to identify the most common themes and how people felt about them. Watson then evaluated top 100 billboard songs to uncover the most common song structure and emotions. Da Kid used these insights to develop his new song “Not Easy,” which quickly jumped to the top of the US and global Spotify viral charts. Hear the song and watch the music video on YouTube. “Not Easy” is available now for purchase on iTunes. Listen to an interview with Da Kid or visit our Watson Music page to learn more about his collaboration with Watson.

 

I look forward to sharing even more client stories from the World of Watson conference in the future and hope to see you there next year.

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Client stories shine World of Watson

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