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Thanks to Watson, This Cardboard Box Knows if You’re Naughty or Nice

Earlier this week, Watson Developer Advocate Josh Zheng showed developers at the Bay Area Bot, Chat and Conversational App Developers Meetup how to give a cardboard robot feelings. Months ago in March, Josh built a candy machine that uses sentiment analysis to understand if what you say to it is positive or negative. Now, he is taking a new level of emotional intelligence to a new machine.

Tjbot watson chatbot

In a two-part tutorial called “Build a Chatbot That Cares ,” Josh uses his adorable robot, TJBot, to show developers how to use Watson Speech to Text, Watson Tone Analyzer, Watson Conversation, and Watson Text To Speech to create a vocal chatbot with empathy.

Watch TJBot in action

Josh’s tutorial shows you how to enable a robot with speech recognition and tone analysis then explains how to create a simple conversation using Watson Conversation. Finally, you’ll learn how to get TJBot to speak. Once all the services are put together, your bot is complete. You can give your bot a name, too.

Why chatbots?

Companies worldwide are investing in chatbots to create great digital experiences for their customers. Now, with a chatbot powered by Watson Services, digital experiences can go beyond ordinary transactions and become fun interactions between brands and customers. For instance, Elemental Path used Watson to enable Dino, a chubby toy dinosaur, to converse with its owner. As the child grows, Dino’s character becomes more personalized. In the medical field, 1Doc3 used Watson to build a bot that interacts with patients to route their questions to the right specialists.

Want to build your own chatbot that cares? Check out Josh’s tutorial here.

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