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Step by Step guide to develop on Bluemix using features from the Liberty Beta

  1. Download liberty beta sample app from wasdev.net I have picked the websocket example available here https://developer.ibm.com/wasdev/downloads/#view/5358e09283bbf9315b00000c
  2. jar -xvf WebsocketSample.jar 
  3. cd wlp/usr/servers/WebsocketSample
  4. create a manifest.yml in the same dir. with the content  below  
  5. cf push websocket-sample -p . -b https://github.com/cloudfoundry/ibm-websphere-liberty-buildpack.git#beta
  6. Access the websocket app at http://websocket-sample.stage1.mybluemix.net/WebsocketApp/
Manifest.yml

env:

    IBM_JVM_LICENSE: L-AWON-8GALN9

    IBM_LIBERTY_LICENSE: L-SWIS-9GXN5D

 

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ROHIT KELAPURE

The IBM_LIBERTY_LICENSE stanza should be updated with the following license L-SWIS-9K5U2K for the August/September beta

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