Blockchain education

Blockchain in academia: Training for students and educators

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Since being published, the next generation of the IBM Blockchain Platform has been announced. Therefore, IBM Blockchain Platform Starter Plan will be removed from the IBM Cloud Catalog starting July 5th, 2019 and you will not be able to provision new instances after that. However, existing instances will be supported until June 4, 2020. To continue your blockchain developer journey with the next gen version of the IBM Blockchain Platform, go here.

As interest in blockchain grows, so does demand for a skilled technical workforce that can use the technology to bring networks into production. To help meet the increasing need for blockchain developers, consultants and architects, IBM has added blockchain to the Academic Initiative, a program that provides students and educators with training resources to develop market-ready skills.

This blog post will help students and educators get started with blockchain and find resources and offers that are available to them. And if you still need a good reason (or three) for learning to build business networks with blockchain, watch this video:

 

Learn more about blockchain today

Resources for students

Students can use the IBM Blockchain Platform Starter Plan for free, without having to enter a credit card, while the plan is in Beta. Starter Plan lets you deploy a blockchain network with a few clicks and offers deployable sample applications and an easy-to-use UI that are ideal for those who are learning. Students at over 1,000 academic institutions are eligible to use the Beta at no risk of charge and additionally get a six-month trial of IBM cloud. To get the promo code, you just need to register with your school credentials.

Students can also start with the free Blockchain essentials course, which introduces the basics concepts behind blockchain for business. After you take the Essentials course, you can use the IBM Blockchain developer foundation course to start building your own blockchain network. If you are interested in developing locally before moving to cloud, or even experimenting with blockchain using just your browser, get started here for an overview of all the available environments and tools.

If you want to follow a more comprehensive learning path, you can use the blockchain educator guide. The guide details paths for aspiring blockchain developers, consultants and architects. It also provides a complete list of blockchain resources, including demos, articles and documentation, books and videos. You can also join the IBM Blockchain Student Community to learn how engage your community through workshops and hackathons, get additional help on use case development, and information on becoming an IBM student ambassador.

Resources for educators

My advice for educators is to start your journey with the blockchain educator guide. You’ll learn the basics of blockchain technology and the careers that you can propose to your students based on their interest in topics such as distributed computing, JavaScript or business operations. You’ll also get an introduction to The Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger, an open source effort to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies, which is hosted by The Linux Foundation. Finally, you can use the e-book, videos, courses, and hands-on labs to enhance engagement in your classroom.

In addition to the publicly available courseware, software and tools, you can download hundreds of full-version resources at no charge from ibm.onthehub.com. These are the same tools IBM clients are using in their production environments. All you need to gain access is valid school credentials.

Building a community for learning and research

Blockchain is a transformative technology for many industries, requiring skills across many professions and domains. But blockchain is also a team sport. Companies must cooperate to activate and participate in blockchain networks, and they must be open to new concepts and relationships for working with the technology. That is why IBM is making its courseware available at no charge, and is providing students and faculty with cloud access to work on collaborative development. IBM is also working with universities to hold blockchain workshops and hackathons, and funding research in blockchain-related fields such as distributed computing, cryptography and higher-level computing languages for business processes.

Join the IBM Blockchain community to stay up to date on the latest developments and find out about upcoming events.

Simplicity, speed and value for blockchain developers

The IBM Blockchain Platform Starter Plan is currently only available in US-South during Beta, and will be more widely available on release.

This post updated on 3-23-18 to include information on the IBM Blockchain Platform Starter Plan.

Blockchain Business Development, IBM Research

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