Timothy Powers

By Tim Powers on November 8, 2016

The Future of Accessibility Shines Bright

Guest post from Richard Schwerdtfeger, IBM CTO of Accessibility Twenty-six years ago I walked into the IBM TJ Watson Research Center to help create the very first Graphical User Interface Screen Reader for the IBM PC. I did not know it but the impact of making the Graphical User Interface accessible on Windows and OS/2 […]

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By Tim Powers on October 10, 2016

Knowbility OpenAIR Competitors Expand Inclusive Design Skills with IBM Accessibility Tools

To help designers and developers create accessible websites and content, IBM is supporting the annual OpenAIR web accessibility challenge by making its accessibility testing tools available to the competitors. Organized by Austin-based Knowbility, the 19th annual OpenAIR pairs participating teams of web developers and designers with registered non-profits to create or improve their website and make […]

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By Tim Powers on August 4, 2016

Girls Who Code Tackle Aging and Isolation

High school students from Girls Who Code, a national non-profit organization dedicated to closing the gender gap in technology, are taking on the challenge of helping seniors learn technology to reduce their feelings of isolation and loneliness. The team, consisting of Heewon Kim, Oumou Camara, Paula Sante, and Elizabeth Paz (see photo), created Elders Connect, […]

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By Tim Powers on June 29, 2016

What the Porn Industry Can Teach Us About Accessibility

PornHub recently announced (safe for work link) that it was offering described video, or narrated sex scenes, for the blind. Described video or audio descriptions help blind viewers understand what is happening on television programs or films. Let’s remove the moral debate of pornographic movies and examine the actual motivation of making its videos more accessible to […]

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By Tim Powers on May 23, 2016

University of Massachusetts Boston Creating an Accessible Campus with IBM Mobile Technology

Guest post from Dr. Ping Chen, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, UMass Boston University campuses are complex and busy mazes of hustle and bustle. At times, they might be under-construction, experiencing changes, or lack signage or symmetry that makes them difficult to navigate, even for those familiar with the layout. People who are blind, use wheelchairs, […]

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By Tim Powers on May 12, 2016

Inclusive Design Can’t Be An Afterthought

Guest post from Sara Mansell, Design Research Lead for Hybrid Integration, IBM Cloud “It was so refreshing to hear a person outside of the accessibility department talking about accessibility,” said Gerry Ellis, an Accessibility and Usability Consultant at Feel the BenefIT, after I presented on accessible design at G3ict‘s International Briefing on Financial Services Accessibility […]

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By Tim Powers on April 15, 2016

Running on Accessibility

Erich Manser trains IBM designers and developers about the importance of not cutting corners when it comes to accessibility and inclusion in the creation of new solutions. He takes the same approach when training for one of his favorite passions… marathons. In this case, Manser has literally learned the importance of staying in, or on, […]

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By Tim Powers on March 7, 2016

Accessibility Comes Alive at SXSW 2016

IBM will once again land upon Austin, Texas for the annual technology extravaganza that is SXSW Interactive (March 11-15, 2016). This year, IBM has created the IBM Cognitive Studio, an immersive showcase of apps, games, VR cycling, Watson-inspired cocktails, and accessibility. (Map to location). On Monday, March 14, IBM Accessibility will showcase how cognitive-powered human senses […]

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By Tim Powers on January 11, 2016

Accessible Digital Publishing: An Interview with George Kerscher

George Kerscher is dedicated to developing technology to make information not only accessible, but fully functional in the hands of persons who are blind and disabled. He himself is blind, and started to develop computer-based information technology in 1987 and coined the term “print disabled” to describe people who cannot effectively read print because of […]

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