Timothy Powers

By Tim Powers on April 25, 2017

Guiding the Way: On the Streets and in Life

by David Wei, Development Manager, Watson Career Coach With ear-splitting applause and screams, I cross the fabled finish line of 121th Boston Marathon, step by step with Erich Manser. I had the opportunity of running the Marathon by being a running guide for Erich, a blind Marathoner, an Ironman, an IBM colleague, and my friend. I […]

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By Tim Powers on March 8, 2017

Automating Accessibility Testing of Web Applications

IBM has released a new solution that is designed to allow developers and testers to integrate automated accessibility testing within Chrome browser development tools to help deliver an optimized user experience and conform to industry standards. IBM AbilityLab™ Dynamic Assessment Plugin, a browser extension that quickly identifies accessibility issues, and evaluates and recommends potential fixes, including those […]

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By Tim Powers on February 22, 2017

Improving Eldercare with Cognitive Computing and the Internet of Things

by John W. Morgan, CEO, Avamere Family of Companies We are just beginning to see the impact Baby Boomers will have on the healthcare industry and post-acute continuum. Every month, more than a quarter million Americans reach retirement age, and each will have unique challenges and diverse and ever-evolving needs, especially as they acquire physical […]

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By Tim Powers on December 28, 2016

IBM Accessibility at CES 2017

At CES 2017, IBM Accessibility Research, Local Motors and the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) Foundation will be sharing how autonomous vehicles will help people with disabilities and the world’s growing aging population remain independent and self-sufficient for as long as possible Hosted by Soledad O’Brien, award-winning journalist and CEO of Starfish Media Group, this session […]

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By Tim Powers on December 14, 2016

OpenAIR Winners Leverage IBM Accessibility Tools

The annual Knowbility OpenAIR web accessibility challenge announced the winners of its 19th annual competition, which pairs teams of web developers and designers with registered non-profits to create or improve their website and make it more accessible to people with disabilities. As part of this year’s competition, IBM made its accessibility testing tools available to […]

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By Tim Powers on November 8, 2016

The Future of Accessibility Shines Bright

Guest post from Richard Schwerdtfeger, IBM CTO of Accessibility Twenty-six years ago I walked into the IBM TJ Watson Research Center to help create the very first Graphical User Interface Screen Reader for the IBM PC. I did not know it but the impact of making the Graphical User Interface accessible on Windows and OS/2 […]

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By Tim Powers on October 10, 2016

Knowbility OpenAIR Competitors Expand Inclusive Design Skills with IBM Accessibility Tools

To help designers and developers create accessible websites and content, IBM is supporting the annual OpenAIR web accessibility challenge by making its accessibility testing tools available to the competitors. Organized by Austin-based Knowbility, the 19th annual OpenAIR pairs participating teams of web developers and designers with registered non-profits to create or improve their website and make […]

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By Tim Powers on August 4, 2016

Girls Who Code Tackle Aging and Isolation

High school students from Girls Who Code, a national non-profit organization dedicated to closing the gender gap in technology, are taking on the challenge of helping seniors learn technology to reduce their feelings of isolation and loneliness. The team, consisting of Heewon Kim, Oumou Camara, Paula Sante, and Elizabeth Paz (see photo), created Elders Connect, […]

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By Tim Powers on June 29, 2016

What the Porn Industry Can Teach Us About Accessibility

PornHub recently announced (safe for work link) that it was offering described video, or narrated sex scenes, for the blind. Described video or audio descriptions help blind viewers understand what is happening on television programs or films. Let’s remove the moral debate of pornographic movies and examine the actual motivation of making its videos more accessible to […]

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