August 10, 2018 By Zia Mohammad 2 min read

Watson Natural Language Classifier

Independent of industry vertical or use case, natural language processing has become central to all user workflows. From developers to data scientists, an optimized workflow is essential.

“At the root of all natural language processing is text classification”

From classifying financial risk and compliance to categorizing service queries and messages, Watson Natural Language Classifier enables you to create, train, and evaluate custom classifiers through machine learning. Important features include the following:

  • Classify natural language text: Classify strings of text into categories of your choice.

  • Leverage IBM Deep Learning as a Service: Train your classifier with up to 20,000 rows of training data.

  • Multi-lingual support: Support is available in English, Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese (Brazilian), and Spanish.

  • Multi-phrase classification: Classify up to 30 separate text inputs in a single API request.

A frictionless user journey

Today we are happy to GA the Watson Natural Language Classifier tooling in Watson Studio. While maintaining existing API functionality, you can train and test your classifiers within Watson Studio.

When redesigning the tooling, it was important to keep the full end-user experience in mind. By addressing common pain points in the beta and old toolkit, the new tooling provides an improved user experience for training classifiers.

In one environment, you train, build, and test your classifiers. Additionally, with Watson Studio, you can import other services, notebooks, frameworks, and models into your projects.

Training a support ticket classifier

Note: Users of the old toolkit can have their data migrated to the new one by following these instructions.

Start building

Product Page | Get Started Free | Case Studies | Sample Apps

Questions or comments? Don’t hesitate to reach out!

 

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