IBM Launches New Skills Programs to Help Students and Technology Professionals Prepare for Jobs of the Future

ARMONK, NEW YORK, December 5, 2012 -- IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced an array of programs and resources to help students and IT professionals develop new technology skills and prepare for jobs of the future. The initiatives include new training courses and resources for IT professionals, technology and curriculum materials for educators and expanded programs to directly engage students with real-world business challenges.

The new resources will help reduce a critical technology skills gap outlined in IBM's 2012 Tech Trends Report released today. The report, authored by the IBM Center for Applied Insights, found that only 1 in 10 organizations has the skills needed to effectively apply advanced technologies such as business analytics, mobile computing, cloud computing and social business. In addition, nearly half of the educators and students surveyed feel there is a major gap in their institution’s ability to meet the growing demand for advanced technology skills.

To view an interactive graphic that illustrates key findings from the report visit: IBM.com/developerworks/techtrendsreport/fasttrack.
"Having a highly skilled workforce is critical to an organization’s ability to innovate, meet client demands and grow,” said Jim Corgel, general manager academic and developer relations, IBM. “In response to the growing IT skill gap, IBM is expanding its skill development programs in key areas such as cyber security, mobile computing and commerce."

New Curriculum, Technology & Training for Faculty In the U.S. alone, IT jobs are expected to grow by 22 per cent through 2020 according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. To help faculty better prepare students for these opportunities, IBM today unveiled the largest expansion of its Academic Initiative since the program began.

For the first time, IBM will offer access to curriculum and training resources on IT security to help students gain market-ready cyber security skills. Cited as the top barrier to adoption of advanced technologies in the IBM Tech Trends Report, cyber security is also a key job growth area. The information cyber security workforce is expected to nearly double by 2015. The new cyber security offerings include:

The ability to bring the latest enterprise technology directly into the classroom at no additional cost is critical in building skills. In addition to cyber security, IBM now provides software licenses and how-to training materials in three new areas:

To help faculty update their skills on advanced technologies, IBM today unveiled a Knowledge Exchange. This online resource allows professors from around the world to share and collaborate on courseware and best practices. The initial offerings in the Knowledge Exchange will feature curriculum from winning IBM Smarter Planet grant faculty members.

New Training Courses and Resources for IT Professionals As more organizations turn to technology to solve tough business challenges, the need for skilled IT professionals continues to grow in all industries. For example, a recent report from TechAmerica outlines the need for government employees to sharpen their skills in the area of big data. In addition, the 2012 IBM Tech Trends reports cites the lack of professionals with business analytics expertise as the number one barrier to adoption for that technology.

To make it easier for IT practitioners to stay current with rapidly evolving technologies, IBM is providing:

New Programs to Engage Students
IBM is also working more closely with students to help them understand how advanced technologies like business analytics and security are critical for a variety of career paths such as business, marketing and science.

IBM and academic experts have shared their views on the specific skills needed in cloud computing, business analytics, social business and mobile computing. To view the videos, visit the IBM Ecosystem YouTube channel.
TheIBM Center for Applied Insights conducted the research and analysis for the 2012 Tech Trends Report. The report is based on a survey of more than 1,900 IT and business professionals, students and professors from around the world.

To access the new resources for professors and academic institutions: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/university/academicinitiative/

To access the new resources for developers: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/

To read the 2012 Tech Trends Report: www.ibm.com/developerworks/techtrendsreport

Contact(s) information:

Joanne Fortin
IBM Canada Media Relations
514-964-8558 fortin@ca.ibm.com