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Using Microsoft .NET in WebSphere Message Broker V8: Part 2: Integrating with Microsoft Word

Ben Thompson (bthomps@uk.ibm.com), Consulting IT Specialist, IBM
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Ben Thompson is a Consulting IT Specialist working on the WebSphere Message Broker development team at the IBM Hursley Software Lab in the UK. He is currently working on the design and implementation of .NET support in Message Broker. In the past, he has worked for IBM Software Services for WebSphere designing and implementing WebSphere solutions for IBM customers worldwide. You can contact Ben at bthomps@uk.ibm.com.
(An IBM developerWorks Contributing Author)
Matthew Golby-Kirk (mgk@uk.ibm.com), Software Developer, IBM
Matthew Golby-Kirk photo
Matthew Golby-Kirk is a software developer working on the WebSphere Message Broker development team at the IBM Hursley Software Lab in the UK. He works on the design and implementation of the HTTP and Web services support, along with the ESQL language run time in WebSphere Message Broker. You can contact Matthew at mgk@uk.ibm.com.

Summary:  This series of four tutorials demonstrates the new support for Microsoft .NET in WebSphere Message Broker V8. Part 2 describes integration with Microsoft Word. Readers should be familiar with either Microsoft .NET or WebSphere Message Broker but need not be familiar with both.

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Date:  18 Jan 2012
Level:  Intermediate

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Preparation and deployment to Message Broker

Having built an assembly file from the C# code, you can drag and drop the assembly file from a Windows Explorer window directly onto a .NETCompute node in a message flow in order to associate the node with the code. This technique results in a hard-coded absolute location for the assembly. This approach saves time when developing, testing, and hot-swapping the .NET code that the Broker is executing. For production situations, a more typical approach is to define a Message Broker Configurable Service that specifies to a .NETCompute node where to locate the assembly file. If a Configurable Service is used, it will override a hard-coded absolute location for the assembly. Here is the drag and drop technique for the configuration of the current scenario:

  1. To prepare for the drag and drop, return to the WebSphere Message Broker Toolkit, where the message flow MyFlow.msgflow that you created earlier should still be open. Open a Windows Explorer window in front of the Toolkit and navigate to the location where you built the assembly file in the previous section. If you have followed the default naming so far, the location will be:
    C:\student\DOTNET\lab_msword\visual studio 2010\Projects\MSWordDotNetProject\
    MSWordDotNetProject\bin\Debug\MSWordDotNetProject.dll
    

    Drag and drop the assembly on top of the .NETCompute node in the flow, as shown by the red arrow:



    Drag and drop assembly to configure the .NETCompute node
  2. Inspect the properties of the .NETCompute node and you should see that the Assembly name property has now been configured, as shown below. Save the message flow by pressing Ctrl-S:

    Assembly name property of the .NETCompute node
  3. In order to deploy the application (which contains the message flow and Web service definition) you have created, simply drag and drop it onto a runtime execution group, such as the default configuration shown below. The red arrow shows the drag and drop movement:

    Application deployment via drag and drop

The next section of the tutorial shows you how to test the scenario.

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