Sharing documents in IBM WebSphere Business Compass

Scenarios for managing information across your organization

WebSphere® Business Compass documents can be kept private, shared only with the team, shared across teams, or made available to everyone in the organization. This article presents four common scenarios that walk you through the different options for providing access to documents. This content is part of the IBM Business Process Management Journal.

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Ann Ewan (ewan@ca.ibm.com), Senior Information Developer, IBM China

Anne Ewan photoAnn Ewan is a senior information developer with the BPM Tools ID team. She was previously team lead of the WebSphere Business Monitor information development team and has worked on the WebSphere Business Modeler information development tean. Ann is also a published author of fantasy novels (Firedrake and Brondings' Honour), and is working on her third book.



Curtis Miles (crmiles@ca.ibm.com), WebSphere Business Monitor Tools Lead Developer, IBM

author photoCurtis Miles is a technical advisor and lead developer for WebSphere Business Compass. He has a passion for creating rich, innovative user interfaces and has extensive Web and Eclipse development experience, having worked on the WebSphere BPM suite for the past few years. When not busy innovating for IBM, he enjoys relaxing with his family and friends at his home just outside of Toronto.



19 January 2011

Overview

WebSphere Business Compass provides a business document authoring environment for capturing your organization's business strategy, capabilities, and processes. But documents that are produced and never used are just dead weight in your organization. This article describes how the business design and implementation documents that are produced by one person or by a team working together can be made available for everyone in the organization to use in their everyday jobs.

The producers of documents in WebSphere Business Compass can share their content so that the rest of the organization can interact with it. The instructions for how to do this are slightly different depending on whether the producer is just you, your team, a few teams, or everyone in the company.

This article describes the following four common document-sharing scenarios:

  1. How do I create documents when I'm just playing or just getting started, and I don't want anyone else to see what I'm doing? (See Working alone and privately.)
  2. How do I work with a team when we all want to work together on documents and see each other's changes? (See Working in a team.)
  3. How do I share documents with other teams so they can see the work that I have done and continue to evolve it? (See Sharing documents across teams.)
  4. What if I have documents that I want to make publicly available within my organization for everyone to see and refer to? (See Using reference documents across the organization.)

Working alone and privately

Brian Bookman, the business analyst for a bookstore chain, has an idea for a new distribution process. He isn't sure if it's feasible yet, so he wants to play around with it and try it out.

On the WebSphere Business Compass home page, Brian selects Start to create a new business design space. He names the space Brian's Business Design World and clicks OK. His new work area opens and Brian selects Create to start creating business design documents.

Brian creates various documents, including a strategy map and a process, and then adds links between documents. Everything that Brian puts into his new space is visible only to him.

After a while, Brian realizes that he could use some information from a document he's been working on in another space. In the Documents tab at the top of the Design page, he selects Repository on the left. (Alternatively, he can select Search in the Share section of the toolbar.) To see a list of all the documents he owns, wherever they are, Brian clicks the arrow beside the search box and selects My Documents, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Searching for your own documents
Searching for your own documents

Click to see larger image

Figure 1. Searching for your own documents

Searching for your own documents

Brian selects Search and sees the list of all his documents. He selects the document he wants and clicks Add shortcut in the Share section of the toolbar to add the document to his space, as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. Adding a document to your space using a shortcut
Adding a document to your space using a shortcut

Click to see larger image

Figure 2. Adding a document to your space using a shortcut

Adding a document to your space using a shortcut

Alternatively, Brian can drag the document from the list of search results into Brian's Business Design World (above Repository on the left).

Now that Brian has added a document that he owns from another space, the changes that he makes in this document will be reflected when he views the document in the other space as well. The spaces provide different windows into the private documents Brian has stored in the repository.


Working in a team

In another part of the bookstore chain's head office, Lisa Leader is setting up a business space for her team. They are going to be working together on a set of documents required for a new product line.

Like Brian, Lisa selects Start on the Compass home page to create a new business design space. She names the space Special Chocolates Product Launch. Because she's assembling a team to work with her on this project, Lisa also enters a description that reflects the business goal for the team.

Figure 3. Adding a description to your space
Adding a description to your space

The new team work area opens and the description is visible on the Overview page. To make this space a shared work area, Lisa adds the rest of the members to the space. In the Team section on the Overview page, she clicks Add Members and begins to add the members of her team. She enters part of each name and clicks Search to find each team member. She checks beside each name and clicks OK to add the team member to the space, as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4. Adding a team member to your space
Adding a team member to your space

Everyone that Lisa adds to the space can edit any documents created in that space.

Figure 5. List of team members on the Overview page
List of team members on the Overview page

Lisa clicks the Design tab to start creating documents. All the documents she creates are editable by all members of her space, but only one person can edit a document at a time. When one person has a document open for editing, the rest of the team can view the document but cannot change it.

By default, the creator of a document is its owner. The owner of the space also owns all documents. On the Design page, you can see the owners of each document in a space by clicking the arrow and selecting the Owners column, as shown in Figure 6.

Figure 6. Adding the Owners column to the list of visible columns
Adding the Owners column to the list of visible columns

Click to see larger image

Figure 6. Adding the Owners column to the list of visible columns

Adding the Owners column to the list of visible columns

As people on the team create documents, all the documents show up on the Design page and can be edited by anyone who is part of the team. At this point, only members of the team can see the documents that were created within the space.


Sharing documents across teams

Brian, the business analyst, has been developing a capability map that structurally describes the functional capabilities available within the organization. Lisa would like to refer to this document while she works on her new project, to see if there are capabilities that her new project can use. She asks Brian if she can take a look at his map.

Brian likes the idea of getting Lisa's feedback on his capability map. To give Lisa access to the document, he goes to his Business Design Home (by clicking Home in the top left of the screen) and then clicks the Document Access Control page.

On the Document Access Control page, Brian selects the capability map and clicks Add Owner, as shown in Figure 7.

Figure 7. Adding an owner to a document
Adding an owner to a document

Click to see larger image

Figure 7. Adding an owner to a document

Adding an owner to a document

Brian checks Lisa's name to add her as an owner of the document. Notice in Figure 8 that he can also see the spaces that have edit access to the document.

Figure 8. A document with two owners on the Document Access Control page
A document with two owners on the Document Access Control page

Back in her Business Design space, Lisa goes to her Documents tab on the Design page and clicks Repository. (Alternatively, she can click Search in the Share section of the toolbar.) She clicks the arrow beside the search box and selects My Documents to see her own documents. When she clicks Search, she sees Brian's capability map in the list because he has added her to the list of owners for the document.

Lisa selects the map and clicks Add shortcut in the Share section of the toolbar to add the map to her team's space. Alternatively, she could drag the map from the list of search results into the space.

By default, the document is read-only when Lisa pulls it into her space, which means that none of her team members can make changes to the document. The document shows a key icon to indicate that it cannot be modified. In addition, instead of the usual Edit | View buttons that normally show up when Lisa hovers over the name of a document, Lisa and her team see only View, as shown in Figure 9.

Figure 9. A document showing the key icon and View button
A document showing the key icon and View button

Click to see larger image

Figure 9. A document showing the key icon and View button

A document showing the key icon and View button

Lisa clicks View to open the capability map. Because she is now an owner of the document, she can click Edit within the document to begin making changes. When she does so, she sees a message reminding her that her whole team has the same access to the documents in this space as she does. If she clicks Edit, she is giving edit access to her whole team.

Figure 10. Warning message to the document owner
Warning message to the document owner

If Lisa clicks Edit and later changes her mind, she can select the capability map on the Document Access Control page, select her space from the list of spaces with access to it, and click Revoke Space Access. The document will still be there and her team will still be able to view it, but they will no longer be able to edit it.

On the other hand, if Lisa has been using the capability map in read-only mode and has not edited it, and members of her team open the document, they cannot edit it either. They see a Request edit access button rather than the Edit button that Lisa, as an owner of the document, sees.

Figure 11. Button to request edit access
Button to request edit access

Larry, a member of Lisa's team, clicks Request edit access to request access. He's prompted to enter the reason for his request.

Figure 12. Entering a reason for the edit access request
Entering a reason for the edit access request

After Larry enters his reason and clicks OK, he sees the message "A request to edit this document has been sent to the document owner."

Both Lisa and Brian receive an email informing them of Larry's request. By requesting edit access to the document, Larry is requesting edit access for all members of his team. Brian, as the document owner, must decide whether he wants to control access to the document and make all the changes himself, or whether he wants to allow all the members of Lisa's team to make changes.

Brian decides to grant edit access to Lisa's team. He goes to the Documents Access Request page in his Business Design Home space and sees Larry's request there. He selects the document in the list and clicks Accept.


Using reference documents across the organization

Lisa's team has now created some new process maps that they're ready to make available to everyone in the organization. Lisa clicks one of the documents, and in the Share section of the toolbar, clicks Make Document Public, as shown in Figure 13.

Figure 13. Making a document public
Making a document public

Lisa sees a message confirming that she wants users in all Business Design spaces to be able to see her process map. When she clicks OK, the current version of the process map is published.

Figure 14. Confirmation message
Confirmation message

The document is now available for everyone in the organization to use, but Lisa can continue to evolve the document. Others won't see her changes until she chooses to make the document public again. When she does that, the new version will replace the previous version.

Brian Bookman, still working on his ideas for the new distribution process in his private workspace, realizes that he can make use of one of Lisa's new processes. In the Documents tab on the Design page, he clicks Search. Since he knows what type of document he's looking for, he selects Process Maps from the include list, as shown in Figure 15.

Figure 15. Narrowing down the search
Narrowing down the search

If he knew the name of the document, or part of it, he could also type that into the search box.

Brian clicks Search and sees a list of all the publicly accessible process documents, including Lisa's. He selects the one he wants and drags it from the list of search results into Brian's Business Design World. A link is created from Brian's private space to the process map. Brian can view the details of Lisa's process, but he cannot change it.

Brian also wants to use a term from the company's vocabulary document in the description for one of the new processes he is creating. In the process editor where he's working, he clicks the Search Vocabulary icon, which launches the vocabulary search window, as shown in Figure 16.

Figure 16. Finding a definition
Finding a definition

Brian types the term he's looking for and clicks Search. WebSphere Business Compass searches for a matching term in all public vocabulary documents.

Unlike Lisa's process map, which Brian brought into his space to round out his own content, Brian does not pull the vocabulary document into his space. He just needs to refer to the definition from his process.


Conclusion

The documents produced in WebSphere Business Compass can be kept private, shared only with a small team, shared with several teams, or made available for everyone in the organization to use in their everyday jobs. Many different sharing scenarios are possible, and you can decide the most appropriate level of access to provide depending on your organization and the context of your work.

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ArticleTitle=Sharing documents in IBM WebSphere Business Compass
publish-date=01192011