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Web services with SOAP over JMS in IBM WebSphere Process Server or IBM WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus v7.0.0.x using IBM WebSphere MQ JMS provider

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In WebSphere Integration Developer, when import or export bindings are generated for a module with the SOAP over JMS protocol selected, it is assumed that the embedded (SIBus) JMS provider is to be used and its resources are always generated. The WebSphere Process Server and WebSphere ESB runtime implementation uses the JMS API, so it is possible for an administrator to enable the use of other JMS providers, in particular the WebSphere MQ JMS provider, to transport SOAP messages over MQ JMS by replacing these generated JMS resources

Find out how to configure imports and exports in WebSphere Process Server and WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus with Web service SOAP over JMS bindings to use WebSphere MQ JMS resources. This article provides example Service Component Architecture (SCA) applications that contain imports and exports with Web services-based SOAP over JMS bindings. It also describes how they are modified to use WebSphere MQ JMS resources. After reading this article, you can apply the steps described here to other such imports and exports.

The procedure is somewhat different between exports and imports. Exports make use of a message-driven bean (MDB) to receive requests, and they send responses to the destination specified by each request's JMSReplyTo header. You can modify the resources for an export via the IBM WebSphere Application Server admin console. In WebSphere Process Server and WebSphere ESB V7.0, the MQ JMS provider is a Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) Connector architecture (JCA) resource adapter, which means that the MDB is configured by an activation specification object, rather than the listener port object that was used in previous releases.

Imports do not use an MDB to receive responses and can be configured to use a single reply queue or one temporary reply queue per request via the JMS URL specified for the import binding in the WebSphere Integration Developer tool. The relevant parts of the syntax of the JMS URL are described in this article.

To perform these configuration procedures, you need the following software:

The application modules in this article have been developed and tested with versions 7.0.0.3 of WebSphere Process Server. These modules are examples to demonstrate how to create and configure SCA modules using SOAP over JMS in WebSphere Integration Developer and WebSphere Process Server or WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus. The downloadable project interchange files are provided in WebSphere Integration Developer V7.0.0.3.

Resources required for point-to-point messaging

This section describes a procedure for defining WebSphere MQ and WebSphere MQ JMS resources that can then be used by an import or export with a Web service SOAP over JMS binding. The names of the resources provided here are examples that you can change as required. First you find out how to work with the point-to-point messaging model using queue destinations. Later, in the Resources required for publish/subscribe messaging section, you learn how to work with the messaging model using topics. There are two ways to create a WebSphere MQ queue manager and queues:

  • Create them from the WebSphere MQ Explorer.
  • Create them from a command line window using WebSphere MQ commands.

For example, from a command line window, you enter> crtmqm QMGR to create a queue manager and strmqm QMGR to start the queue manager. (See Related topics for a link to the WebSphere MQ V7.0 Information Center, which has details on how to create the required objects.)

This procedure requires the following WebSphere MQ queue manager and queues to be created:

  • WebSphere MQ queue manager: QMGR
  • WebSphere MQ queues: REQUESTQ and RESPONSEQ on QMGR for use with the export with Web service SOAP over JMS binding
  • WebSphere MQ queues: REQUESTQ1 andRESPONSEQ1 on QMGR for use with the import with Web service SOAP over JMS binding

Corresponding to these WebSphere MQ resources, you need to create WebSphere MQ JMS Provider resources in the WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus or WebSphere Process Server admin console. You must create these resources under the WebSphere MQ JMS Provider at the node scope. Use the following steps to create the resources required for an export and import configuration:

  1. Create a WebSphere MQ queue connection factory used for request connections for both export and import: requestMQCF, which uses QMGR.
  2. Create a WebSphere MQ JMS queue connection factory used for reply connections for both export and import: replyMQCF using QMGR.
  3. Create a WebSphere MQ JMS queue destination for receiving a request message at an export: requestQ using REQUESTQ.
  4. Create a WebSphere MQ JMS queue destination for sending a request message from an import: requestQ1 using REQUESTQ1.
  5. Create an activation specification on the server: MQAS, which uses requestQ.
  6. Create an activation specification on the server: MQAS1, which uses requestQ1.
  7. Create a WebSphere MQ queue destination for sending a response message: replyQ using RESPONSEQ.

Note: This queue is used by a client application as the destination to which replies are to be sent, specified via the JMSReplyTo header in JMS messages. This destination is not configured against the web service SOAP over JMS export or import bindings.

Application scenario for the point-to-point messaging model

Figure 1. Example of scenario for point-to-point messaging model
Example of scenario for point-to-point messaging model
Example of scenario for point-to-point messaging model
  • The WSMQJMSClient: Web application that uses a JavaServer Pages (JSP) sendMessage.jsp to send SOAP messages.
  • WSMQJMSBackEndService: Web service with SOAP over JMS using WebSphere MQ resources, whose implementation invokes another Web service.
  • WSMQJMSServiceProvider: Another Web service provider using WebSphere MQ resources. Messages flow between these applications as follows:
    1. The client sends a SOAP message to a defined WebSphere MQ queue.
    2. The SOAP message is converted from the WebSphere MQ queue into a business object using an export with a Web service SOAP over JMS binding.
    3. A Java component handles the message and invokes another Web service provider via an import with a Web service SOAP over JMS binding.
    4. The Java component returns a response message to the defined WebSphere MQ queue via an export with Web service SOAP over JMS binding (when the request operation is a request/response operation).

Create an application with a SOAP over JMS export binding

This application is designed to have an export with a Web service SOAP over JMS binding and a Java component with the implementation of the interface of the Web service. This export receives SOAP messages sent by a JMS client application. The SOAP messages are then converted by the run time into business objects for use by components within the application. This application is provided as an example, which is then modified to use WebSphere MQ JMS resources; you can apply the same procedure to your own exports with Web service SOAP over JMS bindings. Let's break this down:

  1. Create a library called MyLibrary, which contains a CustomerService interface with three functions, as shown in Listing 1.
Listing 1. CustomerService interface
CustomerInfo getCustomerInfo(String id);
void createCustomer(String id);
int getQuantity(String id);
  1. Create a module called WSMQJMSServiceProvider, which has an export with a Web service SOAP over JMS binding and a Java component from WebSphere Integration Developer. The ProviderSOAPMQJMSExport has the Web service SOAP over JMS binding as shown in Figure 2.
Figure 2. WSMQJMSServiceProvider application
WSMQJMSServiceProvider application
WSMQJMSServiceProvider application
  1. Make sure this application depends on MyLibrary.

Build the Web service application

To build and install the project from WebSphere Integration Developer, perform the following steps:

  1. Build the project WSMQJMSServiceProvider.
  2. Choose File > Export > Export project to integration module export to export the project to an .ear file: WSMQJMSServiceProvider.ear.
  3. Start the WebSphere Process Server or WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus run time.
  4. Install the .ear file from the WebSphere Application Server admin console.

Install and modify the application to use WebSphere MQ JMS

Some resources of the application should be modified after installation via the admin console. Since WebSphere Process Server and WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus V7.0, you can not modify the resources during installation time via the admin console.

Deploy steps:

  1. Install the WSMQJMSServiceProvider.ear file as defaut without changing anything.
  2. Change the resources after installation; go to the list of the installed applications.
  3. Double-click the WSMQJMSServiceProviderApp application to the configuration, as shown in Figure 3.
Figure 3. Application configuration
Application configuration
Application configuration
  1. Click Message Driven Bean listener bindings in the configuration as highlight 1 in Figure 3
  2. Change the Activation Specification Target Resource JNDI Name to MQAS1, as shown in Figure 4.
Figure 4. Configure Activation Specification for SOAP/MQJMS export
Configure Activation Specification for SOAP/MQJMS export
  1. Click Resource references in the configuration as highlight 2 in Figure 3.
  2. Mapping JNDI names and WebSphere MQ resources by changing the Target Resource JNDI Name for export EJB MessageDriven_ProviderSOAPMQJMSExport_CustomerServiceJmsPort from jms/WebServicesReplyQCF to replyMQCF, as shown in Figure 5.
Figure 5. Mapping JNDI names and WebSphere MQ resources
Target Resource JNDI Name
  1. Start the application.

Create an application with import and export that has Web service SOAP over JMS bindings

The application covered here includes:

  • An export with a Web service SOAP over JMS binding, used for receiving SOAP messages and converting them into business objects.
  • A Java component implementation, which prints the data field in the business object.
  • An import with a Web service SOAP over JMS binding, which invokes the WSMQJMSServiceProvider.

The application is created in WebSphere Integration Developer and is shown in Figure 6.

Figure 6. The WSMQJMSBackEndService application
The WSMQJMSBackEndService application
The WSMQJMSBackEndService application

After you create this application, perform the following steps:

  1. Select CustomerServiceImport1, and modify the destination and connection factory values of the address property, as shown in Figure 7. The updated value for the address property is:
Listing 2. The Web service import with SOAP over JMS binding address property
jms:/queue?destination=requestQ1&
 connectionFactory=requestMQCF&
 targetService=ProviderSOAPMQJMSExport_CustomerServiceJmsPort
Figure 7. The SOAP/MQJMS import property
The SOAP/MQJMS import property
The SOAP/MQJMS import property
  1. Build the application.
  2. Export the application into an .ear file: WSMQJMSBackEndService.ear.
  3. Install the .ear file as default without changing anything.
  4. Config WSMQJMSBackEndServiceApp as already did for WSMQJMSServiceProviderApp.
  5. Change the Activation Specification Target Resource JNDI Name as step 6 for WSMQJMSServiceProviderApp, this time the name is MQAS.
  6. Change the map resource references to resources step in the same way as step 8 for WSMQJMSServiceProviderApp, and change the export EJB MessageDriven_BackEndSOAPMQJMSExport_CustomerServiceJmsPort JNDI name from jms/WebServicesReplyQCF to replyMQCF, and WebServiceReference JNDI name from jms/ProviderSOAPMQJMSExportQCF to requestMQCF.

Using a permanent queue for replies at an import

By default when a request/reponse operation is invoked via an import with a SOAP/JMS binding, the runtime creates a temporary queue for the response. This queue is passed as the replyTo queue in the JMS message sent to the SOAP/JMS service. The SOAP/JMS binding then waits for a response message to be put on the temporary reply queue, and finally discards the queue once the reply has been read. Temporary queues are not able to hold persistent messages, so if you need a permanent reply queue to be used by an import for this or other reasons, it is possible to identify the queue to be used via the URL configured on the import binding. An example of the URL syntax for specifying the reply queue is:

Listing 3. Example of URL syntax for specifying the reply queue
jms:/queue?destination=requestQ1&
 connectionFactory=requestMQCF&
 targetService=ProviderSOAPMQJMSExport_CustomerServiceJmsPort&
 replyToDestination=permanentReplyQ

You would need to ensure the permanentReplyQ JMS resource and corresponding MQ queue are created prior to using an import configured in this way.

Create a SOAP/MQ JMS client application

This section describes the required behaviour of client applications that send SOAP messages to the WebSphere MQ JMS destination, which then correspond to the reconfigured export from earlier steps. The format and the properties of the SOAP messages have to be provided in an appropriate way so that the messages are consumed correctly by the SOAP over JMS export. Listing 3 shows an example of a SOAP message for a one-way message using the CustomerService interface defined earlier.

Listing 4. Example of a SOAP JMS message
<SOAP-ENV:Envelope xmlns:SOAP-ENV="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
     xmlns:q0="http://MyLibrary/CustomerService"
     xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
     xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <SOAP-ENV:Body>
  <q0:createCustomer>
   <id>123</id>
  </q0:createCustomer>
 </SOAP-ENV:Body>
</SOAP-ENV:Envelope>

The following three JMS user properties must be set in messages sent to a SOAP over JMS export:

  • targetFunctionName: The name of the operation (function) in the CustomerService interface to be invoked. In this example the value must be either createCustomer or getCustomerInfo.
  • JMSReplyTo: The destination for the response message is set to replyQ.
  • targetService: The Web service port name. The value must be BackEndSOAPMQJMSExport_CustomerServiceJmsPort. Figure 8 shows an example of a client application implemented as a JSP that sends a SOAP message to the requestQ and gets the response back from the replyQ.
Figure 8. Client application sends a request message
Client application sends a request message
Client application sends a request message

After clicking the sendMessage button, the runtime displays in a console window, as shown in Figure 9, and a response message is received back to the JSP client, as shown in Figure 10.

Figure 9. Runtime result from console window
Runtime result from console window
Runtime result from console window
Figure 10. Response message received from the client application
Response message received from the client application
Response message received from the client application

Resources required for publish/subscribe messaging

This section describes how to use the publish/subscribe model with imports and exports with Web service SOAP over JMS bindings, using the WebSphere MQ JMS provider.

Create WebSphere MQ resources

The publish/subscribe model is designed for an application (the publisher) to send messages to a set of interested applications (the subscribers). Subscribers register their interest in a particular topic, and publishers indicate the topic relevant to their messages. A broker sits in between the publisher and subscribers and sends a copy of each message under a certain topic to the appropriate subscribers. WebSphere MQ includes an embedded broker. To use the publish/subscribe model with WebSphere MQ, you need to configure the following WebSphere MQ resources from the WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus or WebSphere Process Server admin console at the Node scope:

  1. Create a WebSphere MQ JMS topic connection factory, as shown in Figure 11. The broker version is basic, letting you use the WebSphere MQ embedded broker.
Figure 11. Configuration of the WebSphere MQ topic connection factory
Configuration of the WebSphere MQ topic connection factory
Configuration of the WebSphere MQ topic connection factory
  1. Create a WebSphere MQ JMS topic destination called MQTopicDest with a JNDI name, MQTopicDest, and a basic topic name, Greetings, as shown in Figure 12.
Figure 12. Configuration of the WebSphere MQ topic with JNDI name MQTopicDest
Configuration of the WebSphere MQ topic with JNDI name MQTopicDest
Configuration of the WebSphere MQ topic with JNDI name MQTopicDest
  1. Create an activation specification called MQTopicAS, which uses MQTopicCF, as shown in Figure 13.
Figure 13. Configuration of the WebSphere MQ topic activation specification
Configuration of the WebSphere MQ topic activation specification
Configuration of the WebSphere MQ topic activation specification

Configure a WebSphere MQ broker service

To use the WebSphere MQ broker service, there's an initial setup step required only the first time you use the broker. This creates a number of queues, including SYSTEM.BROKER.CONTROL.QUEUE, which is used to handle subscription messages:

$WMQ_INSTALL\Java\bin runmqsc QMGR <MQJMS_PSQ.mqsc

An application scenario for the publish/subscribe model

This application scenario is designed for both a publisher and a subscriber so that they can use WebSphere MQ resources to communicate with SOAP messages. Figure 14 is an example of the application scenario. It includes a WSMQJMSPublisher application and a WSMQJMSSubscriber application. WSMQJMSPublisher is a client application for publishing messages to the MQTopicDest topic. WSMQJMSSubscriber is a Web service application that subscribes to the MQTopicDest topic to receive SOAP messages.

Figure 14. Application scenario for the publish/subscribe model
Application scenario for the publish/subscribe model
Application scenario for the publish/subscribe model

Create an interface with a one-way operation

When using publish/subscribe with an import or export with Web service SOAP over JMS binding, only one-way operations are supported. So an interface with only one-way operations is required. Create the interface using the following steps:

  1. Create a new interface called GreetingService under MyLibrary.
  2. Create a one-way operation in the interface: void sayHello(String message);
  3. Save and build MyLibrary.

Create a subscriber application

  1. In WebSphere Integration Developer, create a new module called WSMQJMSSubscriber with an export with a Webservice SOAP over JMS binding called SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport and a Java component called HandleTopic, as shown in Figure 15.
Figure 15. Example of a Web service application
Example of a Web service application
Example of a Web service application

This module illustrates the use of a WebSphere MQ JMS topic by an export with a Web service SOAP over JMS binding.

  1. Open the WSDL file called WSMQJMSSubscriber_SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport.wsdl in MyLibrary, and change the message type from queue to topic so the SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport binding address property looks like Listing 4.
Listing 5. A web service export with SOAP JMS binding address property
jms:/topic?destination=jms/SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport&
connectionFactory=jms/SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExportQCF&
targetService=SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport_GreetingServiceJmsPort

You can't change this from the SOAP over JMS export property window shown in Figure 16.

Figure 16. WSMQJMS Export property
WSMQJMS Export property
WSMQJMS Export property

This ensures that the export knows to subscribe to a topic to receive request messages. The implementation of the HandleTopic method simply prints out a message in the method— sayHello(String message) —,which is passed by SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport.

  1. Save the changes to build the WSMQJMSSubscriber application.

Deploy and install the subscriber application

Export the WSMQJMSSubscriber application to an EAR file, and install it from the WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus or WebSphere Process Server admin console. The steps are the same as before and install and modify the application to use WebSphere MQ JMS section).

Create a publisher application

This section describes how to create an example publisher application, which makes use of an import with a Web service SOAP over JMS binding. We've chosen to create a module that contains only an import with Web service SOAP over JMS binding. The following steps show you how to create one:

  1. Create a new module called WSMQJMSPublisher.
  2. Navigate to MyLibrary > Web Service Ports > SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport_GreetingServiceJmsPort.
  3. Drag the SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport_GreetingServiceJmsPort onto the WSMQJMSPublisher Assembly Diagram to create an import with the Web service SOAP over JMS binding.
  4. Change the import component name into GreetingServiceSOAPMQJMSImport.
  5. Change the value of the Address property to what's shown in Listing 5.
Listing 6. Web service import with SOAP over JMS binding address property for a topic destination
jms:/topic?destination=jms/SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport&
connectionFactory=jms/SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExportQCF&
targetService=SubscriberSOAPMQJMSExport_GreetingServiceJmsPort

You can directly change this from the import's Web service binding property window, shown in Figure 17.

Figure 17. WSMQJMSPublisher and the import property
WSMQJMSPublisher and the import property
WSMQJMSPublisher and the import property
  1. Build the module and export it as an EAR file.

Test the publisher application from WebSphere Integration Developer

From WebSphere Integration Developer, you add the publisher application to the currently running server:

  1. Right-click the project TestWSMQJMSPub and choose Test > Test Module (see Figure 18).
Figure 18. Test publisher result
Test publisher result
Test publisher result
  1. Enter a string, such as hello, in the message field; the message is then published under the topic Greetings.
  2. The subscriber receives the message and prints it out exactly as shown in the console window.

Conclusion

This article used both the point-to-point messaging model and the publish/subscribe messaging model to demonstrate how to configure WebSphere MQ resources used by Web service SOAP over JMS bindings. For the point-to-point messaging model, you change the export to use a WebSphere MQ JMS message activation specification and modify the export reply connection factory into a WebSphere MQ JMS connection factory after the application installation. For the import, you only need to modify the address property: change the destination to specify into a predefined WebSphere MQ JMS queue destination, and change the connection factory to specify a predefined WebSphere MQ JMS connection factory before the application installation. For a request/response message, the client application has to set the JMSReplyTo header in JMS messages.

For the publish/subscribe message model, you change the export binding address property to make the destination type topic. You also need to change the export activation specification after the application installation time. For the import, you change the destination to specify a WebSphere MQ JMS topic destination and change the connection factory to specify a WebSphere MQ JMS topic connection factory before the application installation.


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static.content.url=http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/js/artrating/
SITE_ID=1
Zone=SOA and web services, WebSphere
ArticleID=753271
ArticleTitle=Web services with SOAP over JMS in IBM WebSphere Process Server or IBM WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus v7.0.0.x using IBM WebSphere MQ JMS provider
publish-date=08242011