Skip to main content

By clicking Submit, you agree to the developerWorks terms of use.

The first time you sign into developerWorks, a profile is created for you. Select information in your profile (name, country/region, and company) is displayed to the public and will accompany any content you post. You may update your IBM account at any time.

All information submitted is secure.

  • Close [x]

The first time you sign in to developerWorks, a profile is created for you, so you need to choose a display name. Your display name accompanies the content you post on developerworks.

Please choose a display name between 3-31 characters. Your display name must be unique in the developerWorks community and should not be your email address for privacy reasons.

By clicking Submit, you agree to the developerWorks terms of use.

All information submitted is secure.

  • Close [x]

developerWorks Community:

  • Close [x]

Linux for Windows systems administrators

A knowledge path for Windows administrators using Linux for the first time

Date:  25 Sep 2012 |Level: Intermediate |

1. Discovering Linux's file systems and files

Close to the hardware and touched by all are the file systems. You might have been around when Windows® moved from a FAT32 file system to the NTFS file system. Likewise, the most popular file system for Linux®—and likely the one you'll work with initially—is the Extended File System (ext). It has made huge improvements through its evolution from ext to ext2, ext3, and now ext4. Note that Linux doesn't have a registry: It's all about files. Files are used to configure practically everything about the operating system, including user accounts, applications, booting, and kernel parameters. Even the network sockets are files. Understanding the architecture and permissions of Linux files will go a long way as you intertwine your Windows knowledge with that of Linux.

2. Managing accounts

Like Windows, Linux has a default administrative account, user accounts, system accounts, and groups. Learn the proper way to access the Linux administrative, or root account, and then create and manage various users and groups.

3. Using graphical user interface tools

Using Linux doesn't mean you'll have to abandon what you are already comfortable doing: working from the desktop. Whether you work with users, monitor logs, secure the system, or manage a server service, the desktop can provide a nice point-and-click alternative to the console or terminal.

4. Running applications

Many user and server applications work with both Windows and Linux—IBM® DB2®, for example. Users of these applications might not have to do anything different, but you'll need to understand a few things, such as what it takes to start and keep the application running. Some of your favorite Windows applications might even run on Linux. If not, there's a good chance you'll find a suitable alternative. Either way, a key first step is to learn how Linux applications are executed and run.

5. Day-to-day maintenance

The concept of backups, restores, log reading, upgrades—you get the point—the day-to-day chores that ensure the system is available and responding to the users: You do the same tasks in Linux as in Windows. You just need to know what tools are available and how to use them.




Rate this content




Give us feedback

Submission failed. Please try again.

Please complete one of the following questions before submitting.

1. Are you finished with this knowledge path?

       

2. How much did you learn?

           

3. Tell us more

  • What did you like/dislike?
  • What can we do better?

2500 characters left

Disabled Submit button

developerWorks: Sign in


Need an IBM ID?
Forgot your IBM ID?


Forgot your password?
Change your password

By clicking Submit, you agree to the developerWorks terms of use.

 


The first time you sign into developerWorks, a profile is created for you. Select information in your developerWorks profile is displayed to the public, but you may edit the information at any time. Your first name, last name (unless you choose to hide them), and display name will accompany the content that you post.

Choose your display name

The first time you sign in to developerWorks, a profile is created for you, so you need to choose a display name. Your display name accompanies the content you post on developerWorks.

Please choose a display name between 3-31 characters. Your display name must be unique in the developerWorks community and should not be your email address for privacy reasons.

(Must be between 3 – 31 characters.)


By clicking Submit, you agree to the developerWorks terms of use.

 


Thank you for your feedback. We appreciate your sharing your opinion with us.

Do you want to save your progress?

, Sign in to save your progress

Save your progress

Sorry. Our server is not available, and we cannot display your saved progress at this time.

Your progress will be displayed when the server is available again. Any previous progress is retained, and additional progress is being tracked.

If your most recent progress is not displayed within 24 hours, you can click the checkmark to indicate completion.

static.content.url=http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/js/artrating/
SITE_ID=1
Zone=Linux, Open source
ArticleID=837156
publish-date=09252012