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Basics of Linux system administration: Working at the console

Get comfortable with Linux at the command line

Date:  07 Oct 2011 (Published 22 Mar 2011) |Level: Intermediate |

1. Before you begin

You need a working Linux system that includes the bash shell, so you can practice the commands and techniques covered in this knowledge path. Our command examples are taken from Ubuntu and Fedora, but they apply to most other Linux distributions as well.

2. Get comfortable with the bash shell

Roll up your sleeves and get your hands on Linux, starting with fundamentals of the bash shell's command line, including basic bash commands, environment variables, and system information; finding, listing, moving, copying, and archiving files; and redirecting and piping text to stdout, files, and command inputs.

3. Search and edit text files

Working in a command shell environment such as bash involves manipulating text: cutting and pasting, joining strings together, sorting, and concatenating. Learn how to use regular expressions and the grep search tool to handle text like the Linux pros. Also, brush up on the popular Linux text editor, vi.

4. Take control of processes

Managing processes is everyday work for Linux administrators and developers. Learn how to shuffle processes between foreground and background, find out what's running, kill processes, and keep processing running after you've left for the day. Also learn how to set and change process priorities.




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