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LPI exam 301 prep, Topic 301: Concepts, architecture, and design

Senior Level Linux Professional (LPIC-3)

Sean A. Walberg (sean@ertw.com), Senior Network Engineer
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Sean Walberg has been working with Linux and UNIX systems since 1994 in academic, corporate, and Internet Service Provider environments. He has written extensively about systems administration over the past several years. You can contact him at sean@ertw.com.

Summary:  In this tutorial, Sean Walberg helps you prepare to take the Linux Professional Institute® Senior Level Linux Professional (LPIC-3) exam. In this first in a series of six tutorials, Sean introduces you to Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) concepts, architecture, and design. By the end of this tutorial, you will know about LDAP concepts and architecture, directory design, and schemas.

Date:  23 Oct 2007
Level:  Intermediate PDF:  A4 and Letter (113 KB | 26 pages)Get Adobe® Reader®

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Summary

In this tutorial you learned about LDAP concepts, architecture, and design. LDAP grew out of a need to connect to X.500 directories over IP in a simplified way. A directory presents data to you in a hierarchical manner, much like a tree. Within this tree are records that are identified by a distinguished name and have many attribute-value pairs, including one or more object classes that determine what data can be stored in the record.

LDAP itself refers to the protocol used to search and modify the tree. Practically though, the term LDAP is used for all components, such as LDAP server, LDAP data, or just "It's in LDAP".

Data in LDAP is often imported and exported with LDIF, which is a textual representation of the data. An LDIF file specifies a changetype, such as add, delete, modrdn, moddn, and modify. These operations let you add entries, delete entries, move data around in the tree, and change attributes of the data.

Designing the tree correctly is crucial to long-term viability of the LDAP server. A correct design means fewer change operations are needed, which leads to consistent data that can easily be found by other applications. By choosing common attributes, you ensure that other consumers of the LDAP data understand the meaning of the attributes and that fewer translations are required.

The LDAP schema dictates which attributes can be used in your server. Within the schema are definitions of the attributes, including OIDs to uniquely identify them, instructions on how to store and sort the data, and textual descriptions of what the attributes do. Object classes group attributes together and can be defined as structural, auxiliary, or abstract.

Structural object classes define the record, so a record may only have one structural object class. Auxiliary object classes add more attributes for specific purposes and can be added to any record. An abstract object class must be inherited and cannot be used directly.

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