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5 things you didn't know about ...java.util.concurrent, Part 1

Multithreaded programming with concurrent Collections

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Concurrent Collections were a huge addition to Java™ 5, but many Java developers lost sight of them in all the hoopla about annotations and generics. Additionally (and perhaps more truthfully), many developers avoid this package because they assume that it, like the problems it seeks to solve, must be complicated.

In fact, java.util.concurrent contains many classes that effectively resolve common concurrency problems, without requiring you to break a sweat. Read on to learn how java.util.concurrent classes like CopyOnWriteArrayList and BlockingQueue help you solve the pernicious challenges of multithreaded programming.

1. TimeUnit

While it's not a Collections class, per se, the java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit enumeration makes code vastly easier to read. Using TimeUnit frees developers using your method or API from the tyranny of the millisecond.

TimeUnit incorporates all units of time, ranging from MILLISECONDS and MICROSECONDS up through DAYS and HOURS, which means it handles almost all time-span types that a developer might need. And, thanks to conversion methods declared on the enum, it's even trivial to convert HOURS back to MILLISECONDS when time speeds up.

2. CopyOnWriteArrayList

Making a fresh copy of an array is too expensive an operation, in terms of both time and memory overhead, to consider for ordinary use; developers often resort to using a synchronized ArrayList instead. That's also a costly option, however, because every time you iterate across the contents of the collection, you have to synchronize all operations, including read and write, to ensure consistency.

This puts the cost structure backward for scenarios where numerous readers are reading the ArrayList but few are modifying it.

CopyOnWriteArrayList is the amazing little jewel that solves this problem. Its Javadoc defines CopyOnWriteArrayList as a "thread-safe variant of ArrayList in which all mutative operations (add, set, and so on) are implemented by making a fresh copy of the array."

The collection internally copies its contents over to a new array upon any modification, so readers accessing the contents of the array incur no synchronization costs (because they're never operating on mutable data).

Essentially, CopyOnWriteArrayList is ideal for the exact scenario where ArrayList fails us: read-often, write-rarely collections such as the Listeners for a JavaBean event.

3. BlockingQueue

The BlockingQueue interface states that it is a Queue, meaning that its items are stored in first in, first out (FIFO) order. Items inserted in a particular order are retrieved in that same order — but with the added guarantee that any attempt to retrieve an item from an empty queue will block the calling thread until the item is ready to be retrieved. Likewise, any attempt to insert an item into a queue that is full will block the calling thread until space becomes available in the queue's storage.

BlockingQueue neatly solves the problem of how to "hand off" items gathered by one thread to another thread for processing, without explicit concern for synchronization issues. The Guarded Blocks trail in the Java Tutorial is a good example. It builds a single-slot bounded buffer using manual synchronization and wait()/notifyAll() to signal between threads when a new item is available for consumption, and when the slot is ready to be filled with a new item. (See the Guarded Blocks implementation for details.)

Despite the fact that the code in the Guarded Blocks tutorial works, it's long, messy, and not entirely intuitive. Back in the early days of the Java platform, yes, Java developers had to tangle with such code; but this is 2010 — surely things have improved?

Listing 1 shows a rewritten version of the Guarded Blocks code where I've employed an ArrayBlockingQueue instead of the hand-written Drop.

Listing 1. BlockingQueue
import java.util.*;
import java.util.concurrent.*;

class Producer
    implements Runnable
{
    private BlockingQueue<String> drop;
    List<String> messages = Arrays.asList(
        "Mares eat oats",
        "Does eat oats",
        "Little lambs eat ivy",
        "Wouldn't you eat ivy too?");
        
    public Producer(BlockingQueue<String> d) { this.drop = d; }
    
    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            for (String s : messages)
                drop.put(s);
            drop.put("DONE");
        }
        catch (InterruptedException intEx)
        {
            System.out.println("Interrupted! " + 
                "Last one out, turn out the lights!");
        }
    }    
}

class Consumer
    implements Runnable
{
    private BlockingQueue<String> drop;
    public Consumer(BlockingQueue<String> d) { this.drop = d; }
    
    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            String msg = null;
            while (!((msg = drop.take()).equals("DONE")))
                System.out.println(msg);
        }
        catch (InterruptedException intEx)
        {
            System.out.println("Interrupted! " + 
                "Last one out, turn out the lights!");
        }
    }
}

public class ABQApp
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        BlockingQueue<String> drop = new ArrayBlockingQueue(1, true);
        (new Thread(new Producer(drop))).start();
        (new Thread(new Consumer(drop))).start();
    }
}

The ArrayBlockingQueue also honors "fairness" — meaning that it can give reader and writer threads first in, first out access. The alternative would be a more efficient policy that risks starving out some threads. (That is, it would be more efficient to allow readers to run while other readers held the lock, but you'd risk a constant stream of reader threads keeping the writer from ever doing its job.)

BlockingQueue also supports methods that take a time parameter, indicating how long the thread should block before returning to signal failure to insert or retrieve the item in question. Doing this avoids an unbounded wait, which can be death to a production system, given an unbounded wait can all too easily turn into a system hang requiring a reboot.

4. ConcurrentMap

Map hosts a subtle concurrency bug that has led many an unwary Java developer astray. ConcurrentMap is the easy solution.

When a Map is accessed from multiple threads, it's common to use either containsKey() or get() to find out whether a given key is present before storing the key/value pair. But even with a synchronized Map, a thread could sneak in during this process and seize control of the Map. The problem is that the lock is acquired at the start of get(), then released before the lock can be acquired again, in the call to put(). The result is a race condition: it's a race between the two threads, and the outcome will be different based on who runs first.

If two threads call a method at exactly the same moment, each will test and each will put, losing the first thread's value in the process. Fortunately, the ConcurrentMap interface supports a number of additional methods that are designed to do two things under a single lock: putIfAbsent(), for instance, does the test first, then does a put only if the key isn't stored in the Map.

5. SynchronousQueues

SynchronousQueue is an interesting creature, according to the Javadoc:

A blocking queue in which each insert operation must wait for a corresponding remove operation by another thread, and vice versa. A synchronous queue does not have any internal capacity, not even a capacity of one.

Essentially, SynchronousQueue is another implementation of the aforementioned BlockingQueue. It gives us an extremely lightweight way to exchange single elements from one thread to another, using the blocking semantics used by ArrayBlockingQueue. In Listing 2, I've rewritten the code from Listing 1 using SynchronousQueue instead of ArrayBlockingQueue:

Listing 2. SynchronousQueue
import java.util.*;
import java.util.concurrent.*;

class Producer
    implements Runnable
{
    private BlockingQueue<String> drop;
    List<String> messages = Arrays.asList(
        "Mares eat oats",
        "Does eat oats",
        "Little lambs eat ivy",
        "Wouldn't you eat ivy too?");
        
    public Producer(BlockingQueue<String> d) { this.drop = d; }
    
    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            for (String s : messages)
                drop.put(s);
            drop.put("DONE");
        }
        catch (InterruptedException intEx)
        {
            System.out.println("Interrupted! " + 
                "Last one out, turn out the lights!");
        }
    }    
}

class Consumer
    implements Runnable
{
    private BlockingQueue<String> drop;
    public Consumer(BlockingQueue<String> d) { this.drop = d; }
    
    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            String msg = null;
            while (!((msg = drop.take()).equals("DONE")))
                System.out.println(msg);
        }
        catch (InterruptedException intEx)
        {
            System.out.println("Interrupted! " + 
                "Last one out, turn out the lights!");
        }
    }
}

public class SynQApp
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        BlockingQueue<String> drop = new SynchronousQueue<String>();
        (new Thread(new Producer(drop))).start();
        (new Thread(new Consumer(drop))).start();
    }
}

The implementation code looks almost identical, but the application has an added benefit, in that SynchronousQueue will allow an insert into the queue only if there is a thread waiting to consume it.

In practice, SynchronousQueue is similar to the "rendezvous channels" available in languages like Ada or CSP. These are also sometimes known as "joins" in other environments, including .NET (see Related topics).

In conclusion

Why struggle with introducing concurrency to your Collections classes when the Java runtime library offers handy, prebuilt equivalents? The next article in this series explores even more of the java.util.concurrent namespace.


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Zone=Java development
ArticleID=490327
ArticleTitle=5 things you didn't know about ...java.util.concurrent, Part 1
publish-date=05182010