Exposing DB2 Version 9 pureXML using WebSphere Integration Developer

Using DB2 pureXML FpML Web services with WebSphere Integration Developer

IBM offers a set of industry specific Web services that provide operations to expose the native XML capabilities of IBM® DB2® 9 for Linux, UNIX and Windows. These Web services can be accessed in a Websphere Integration Developer module that can be used in a work flow to manipulate your FpML data. Follow step-by-step instructions on how to build, test, and deploy a mediation module that can store well-formed XML documents in a DB2 XML column using a WebSphere Integration Developer module.

Karen Devlin (kdevlin@us.ibm.com), Software Engineer, IBM

Karen DevlinKaren Devlin is a software engineer with the DB2 XML Enablement team. During her IBM career, she has published two articles in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin and received a patent award for her work on creating Xpath expressions in an XQuery Builder.



20 September 2007

Before you start

Learn what to expect from this tutorial, and how to get the most out of it.

About this tutorial

IBM offers a set of industry specific Web services that provide operations to expose the native XML capabilities of DB2. These Web services can be accessed in a Websphere Integration Developer module that can be used in a work flow to manipulate your FpML data. Follow step-by-step instructions on how to build, test, and deploy a mediation module that can store well-formed XML documents in a DB2 XML column using a WebSphere Integration Developer module.

Objectives

This tutorial teaches you to create, deploy and test a mediation module. It also discusses ways to retrieve XML documents using the examples from within the tutorial.

Prerequisites

You should be familiar with WebSphere Integration Developer and have a high level understanding of mediation flow concepts and WSDL.

System requirements

This tutorial requires Internet Explorer and WebSphere Integration Developer 6.0.2.


Introduction

Many industries are developing and adopting new XML messaging standards. Emerging industry formats include ACORD for insurance, FpML for financial derivatives, FIXML for financial trading, MISMO for mortgages and HL7 for health care applications. The native XML storage and retrieval capabilities of IBM® DB2® allow customers to maximize the performance and reliability of their applications.

This tutorial describes how to build a mediation module that can store well-formed XML documents in a DB2 XML column using a WebSphere Integration Developer module. For the purposes of this article, the XML insert operation is exposed using a Web service. The Web service and supporting WSDL are provided by the alphaWorks FpML DB2 pureXML™ Demo.

The alphaWorks Web service uses DB2 9 with pureXML. This tutorial was created using WebSphere Integration Developer 6.0.2.

This tutorial can be used to create mediations that expose any Web service operation described in an associated WSDL file. You should be familiar with WebSphere Integration Developer and have a high level understanding of mediation flow concepts and WSDL.


Introducing the Module

Mediation services manage the communication between clients (requesters) and existing services (providers). The mediation intercepts messages from the client and performs any modification required to ensure the message is in a format the service accepts. The mediation module can be utilized by any WebSphere business integration module or other client to store or retrieve data.

The alphaWorks Web service provides multiple operations for processing pureXML data. It is the developer’s decision to choose which operations are relevant to the mediation module and create the necessary components and wires to support the exposed operations. In order to demonstrate the interaction between a mediation module and an external Web service, the mediation created by this tutorial exposes only the insert method for storing an XML document. This method does not perform schema validation and accepts two parameters of type string. Listing 1 shows the WSDL description for the insert method.

Listing 1. Insert operation WSDL
<element name="insert">
<complexType>    
<sequence>
<element name="document" type="string"/>
<element name="comment" type="string"/>
</sequence>
</complexType>
</element>

The mediation created in this tutorial accepts the .xml file name as an input string. The mediation module reads the contents of the specified input file and passes the contents of the file as a text string to the Web service for insertion into the alphaWorks DB2 XML column. An integer value is returned. A "1" indicates the document was inserted successfully. A "0" indicates that an error occurred during insertion.

Create a mediation module:

  1. From the File menu in the Business Integration Perspective, select File -> New -> Project -> Mediation Module.
  2. Enter the mediation Module Name: InsertFPML.

Figure 1 shows these steps:

Figure 1. Create mediation module
Figure 1. Create mediation module
  1. Change the Target Runtime to WebSphere Process Server v6.0 and click Finish. Note that this example also runs successfully on WebSphere ESB Server v6.0.

Create the Assembly Diagram:

  1. From the Business Integration Perspective, open the Assembly Diagram for the new module. Double click on Assembly Diagram in the InsertFPML folder to open the assembly diagram, as shown below:
Figure 2. Assembly Diagram
Figure 2. Assembly Diagram

Define the export

An export provides the interface for invoking the module. The module can be invoked directly by users, or it can be invoked by other business services.

  1. Add an export to the Assembly Diagram by dragging an export object onto the palette. export Rename the export InsertFPMLExport by clicking on the default name Export1 and changing it.
  2. Rename the mediation object from Mediation1 to InsertFPMLMediation.

Figure 3 shows the new names:

Figure 3. Create InsertFPMLExport
Figure 3. Create InsertFPMLExport
  1. Create a wire from InsertFPMLExport to InsertFPMLMediation.
  2. When the wire is created, a popup window is displayed asking if you want to create a new interface. Click OK to continue.
  3. In the Add Interface window, click the New button to create a new interface. Name the interface InsertFPMLInterface and click Finish. This interface defines the operations, inputs and outputs for the module.

Figure 4 shows the connection between InsertFPMLExport and Insert FPMLMediation

Figure 4. InsertFPMLExport/InsertFPMLMediation connection
Figure 4. InsertFPMLExport/InsertFPMLMediation Connection

Define the module interface:

  1. Open the interface in the interface editor. The interfaces are shown in the Business Integration View under InsertFPML -> Interfaces. Double click on InsertFPMLInterface, as shown in Figure 5.
Figure 5. Business Integration view
Figure 5. Business Integration View
  1. Add a Request/Response operation to the palette. Request response operation Rename the operation to insertFPMLDoc.
  2. Change the name of the input parameter to xmlFile with a Type string.
  3. Change the name of the output parameters to insertFPMLResponse with a Type of int.

Figure 6 shows these steps.

When the module is tested, this operation is invoked by the user. The user specifies the xmlFile name as the input string. The user will see a "1" returned as the insertFPMLResponse output parameter if the insert was successful or a "0" if there was an error during the insert.

Figure 6. InsertFPMLInterface
Figure 6. InsertFPMLInterface
  1. Save the interface.

Define the import:

An Import allows modules to use external services.

  1. Back in Assembly Diagram, add an Import to the palette. import
  2. Rename the import InsertFPMLImport. This import exposes the alphaWorks Web services for use within the module.
Figure 7. InsertFPMLImport
Figure 7. InsertFPMLImport

Download the Web service WSDL:

The generated WSDL interface for the alphaWorks FpML Web services can be found on the DB2 pureXML Demo page.

Using Internet Explorer, right click in the window where the WSDL is displayed and select View Source from the context menu, as shown in Figure 8. Save the interface locally. Make sure the file type is .wsdl (i.e. alphFpML.wsdl). Verify that the file contains well-formed XML. Other browsers may include invalid characters in the file, and this causes errors to occur when the file is imported.

Figure 8. alphaWorks WSDL
Figure 8. alphaWorks WSDL

Import the Web service WSDL:

  1. In the Business Integration view, right click on InsertFPML -> Interfaces and select Import from the drop down menu.
Figure 9. Import an interface
Figure 9. Import an interface
  1. Select File System as the import source. Browse to the saved location, select the WSDL file and select Finish to complete the import.

Figure 10 shows these steps:

Figure 10. Import the alphaWorks WSDL
Figure 10. Import the alphaWorks WSDL

Two new files, theGetPostPortType and theSoapPortType are created under InsertFPML -> Interface in the Business Integration view. Figure 11 shows these new files:

Figure 11. Business Integration view after import
Figure 11. Business Integration view after import
  1. Right click in InsertFPMLImport in the Assembly Diagram and select Add Interface from the menu. Select theSoapPortType from the list and click on the OK button. This interface contains the alphaWorks Web service description.
Figure 12. Add alphaWorks interface
Figure 12. Add alphaWorks interface
  1. Add a wire from InsertFPMLMediation to InsertFPMLImport. A pop up window asks if you want to create a matching reference. Click OK to create the reference.
  2. Save the diagram. The Assembly Diagram now looks like this:
Figure 13. InsertFPMLImport connection
Figure 13. InsertFPMLImport connection

Add Web service bindings:

A Web service binding allows a module to access an external service over the internet. The Web service binding specifies the protocol of the external service. In this case, the alphaWorks service protocol is SOAP/HTTP.

  1. Add a Web services binding to InsertFPMLExport. Right click in InsertFPMLExport and select Generate Binding -> Web Service Binding from the menu, as shown below:
Figure 14. Generate Web service binding
Figure 14. Generate Web Service Binding
  1. As Figure 15 shows, select soap/http in the Transport Selection window.
Figure 15. Transport Selection
Figure 15. Transport Selection
  1. Add a Web services binding to InsertFPMLImport. Right click in InsertFPMLImport and select Generate Binding -> Web Service Binding from the menu. Click on the Browse button in the pop up window.
Figure 16. Web Service Import Details
Figure 16. Web Service Import Details
  1. As Figure 17 illustrates, select theSoapPort from the list and click OK.
Figure 17. Service Port Selection
Figure 17. Service Port Selection
  1. Save the Assembly Diagram.

Create the mediation flow:

The mediation flow provides the communication between the user interface and the external Web service. The Web service operation to be invoked and the transition of the input/output or request/response messages is defined in the mediation flow.

  1. Double click on InsertFPMLMediation in the Assembly Diagram. A pop up window is displayed asking if you want to create the implementation. Select Yes. Accept the default folder for the implementation.

The implementation is opened in the Mediation Flow editor. To open the Mediation Flow editor manually, double click on InsertFPMLMediation in the Business Integration view. It should appear like this:

Figure 18. Mediation Flow editor
Figure 18. Mediation Flow Editor
  1. Click on the down arrow to extend the Operation connections section. Create a connection between insertFPMLDoc and the desired method, in this case insert.

Figure 19 shows this connection:

Figure 19. Operation connection
Figure 19. Operation connection
  1. Click on the up arrow to show the flow section. The Request and Response tabs are displayed, as shown in the figure below. If the Request and Response tabs are not displayed in the flow section, make sure the connection wire is selected in the operation connection section above.
Figure 20. Request/Response tabs
Figure 20. Request/Response tabs
  1. Click on the up arrow once again to extend the flow section.
  2. Add a Custom Mediation to the palette in the flow section. custom mediation Rename the custom mediation insertCustomMediation, as shown in Figure 21. A Custom Mediation allows you to invoke an import to use an external service and defines the flow of request (input) messages and response (output) messages.
Figure 21. Custom Mediation
Figure 21. Custom Mediation
  1. Click on insertCustomMediation and open the Details tab in the Properties view. As Figure 22 illustrates, select the Invoke radio button. A pop up window is displayed to compose a snippet of the selected type. Select Yes to continue.
Figure 22. insertCustomMediation Properties View Details
Figure 22. insertCustomMediation Properties View Details

.

  1. In order to create the wires in the Request/Response flow, the message types between the input and output terminals must be compatible. Select the Terminal tab in the Properties view. Select Input terminal > in and click the Change button.
Figure 23. Input terminal
Figure 23. Input terminal
  1. Click on the Browse button and select InsertFPMLInterface from the list. Select the values shown in Figure 24 for the other fields and click OK .
Figure 24. Input Message Type
Figure 24. Input Message Type

The properties view should look like this:

Figure 25. insertCustomMediation Input Terminal Properties
Figure 25. insertCustomMediation Input Terminal Properties
  1. Save the changes.
  2. Back in the Mediation Flow editor, create a wire between the Input node and insertCustomMediation.

Figure 26 shows the connection between the Input node and insertCustomMediation:

Figure 26. insertCustomMediation input connection
Figure 26. insertCustomMediation input connection
  1. Make sure insertCustomMediation is still selected. In the Terminals tab of the Properties view, select the Output terminal > out and click the Change button.
Figure 27. Output terminal
Figure 27. Output terminal
  1. Click on the Browse button and select InsertFPMLInterface from the list. Select the values shown in Figure 28 for the other fields and click on OK.
Figure 28. Output Message Type
Figure 28. Output Message Type

The properties view should look like this:

Figure 29. insertCustomMediation Output Terminal Properties
Figure 29. insertCustomMediation Output Terminal Properties
  1. Save the changes.
  2. Back in the Mediation Flow editor, create a wire between insertCustomMediation and the Input Response node.

Figure 30 shows the wire between insertCustomMediation and the Input Response node:

Figure 30. insertCustomMediation Input Response connection
Figure 30. insertCustomMediation Input Response connection
  1. Save your work. Note that an error marker appears in insertCustomMediation. Ignore this error for now. The implementation has not been created.

Generate Reference:

A Java component invokes the Web service operation. WebSphere Integration Developer automatically generates the reference for the Java component that matches the WSDL for the Web service.

  1. Select the Details tab in the Properties view. Verify that the Invoke radio button is selected in the Implementation field. In the Reference field drop down, add a new reference. In the pop up window, select the Generate a new interface for this reference radio button, as shown below:
Figure 31. Generate New Interface
Figure 31. Generate New Interface
  1. Click the OK button. The Details tab in the Properties view should look like this:
Figure 32. insertCustomMediation Properties view Details with Reference
Figure 32. insertCustomMediation Properties view Details with Reference
  1. Save the changes in the Mediation Flow editor. Now the error marker in the Mediation Flow editor should disappear as Figure 33 illustrates.
Figure 33. insertCustomMediation request flow
Figure 33. insertCustomMediation Request Flow
  1. Go back to the Assembly Diagram. Right click on InsertFPMLMediation and select the Synchronize Interfaces and References -> from Implementation option. This adds the reference for the Java component to the mediation component.
Figure 34. Synchronize interfaces and references
Figure 34. Synchronize Interfaces and References

A reference is added to InsertFPMLMediation in the Assembly Diagram:

Figure 35. Assembly Diagram with reference
Figure 35. Assembly Diagram with Reference

Create the Java component:

The Java component actually invokes the Web service operation.

  1. Add a Java component to the diagram. java icon Rename the Java component insertFPMLJava, as shown in the figure below:
Figure 36. Assembly Diagram with Java component
Figure 36. Assembly Diagram with Java Component
  1. Create a wire from the new reference in InsertFPMLMediation to insertFPMLJava. Select OK to create a matching reference on the target.
  2. Create another wire from insertFPMLJava to InsertFPMLImport. Select OK to create a matching reference on the target. If a pop up window is displayed asking if you want to convert the WSDL to .java select No.
  3. Save the changes. The Assembly Diagram for the module is complete.

Figure 37 shows the completed Assembly Diagram:

Figure 37. InsertFPML Assembly Diagram
Figure 37. InsertFPML Assembly Diagram
  1. Create the implementation for the Java component. Double click on insertFPMLJava. Select Yes when the pop up window is displayed asking if you would like to implement the component. Accept the default package. Again, if a pop up window is displayed asking if you would like to convert WSDL to Java, select No.
  2. Open the Java implementation by double clicking on InsertFPMLJava. Replace the mediate( ) method and add the invokeWebService ( ) method from the following code. Note that the code below assumes the naming conventions described in this tutorial. Differences in the module name, interface names, operations and parameters require modifications to the code below.
Listing 2. Java Mediation Code
public DataObject mediate(DataObject input1) {	
	System.out.println("In Response Mediation");

// Uses the method name and input parameter from
// InsertFPMLInterface
	String fileName = input1.getString("body/insertFPMLDoc/xmlFile");
	String xmlText = "";
	ServiceManager serviceManager = ServiceManager.INSTANCE;
	BOFactory bofactory = (BOFactory) serviceManager
		.locateService("com/ibm/websphere/bo/BOFactory");

	DataObject insertXMLObject = bofactory.createByElement(
		"http://schemas.ibm.com/fpml/fpml/fpml.dadx", "insert");
		
	DataObject message = bofactory.createByMessage(
		"http://InsertFPML/InsertFPMLInterface",
		"insertFPMLDocResponseMsg");
	DataObject myRes = bofactory.createByElement(
		"http://InsertFPML/InsertFPMLInterface",
		"insertFPMLDocResponse");
		
	File xmlFileObj = new File (fileName);
	if (!xmlFileObj.canRead()) {
		System.out.println("ERROR:  File " + fileName + " cannot be read");
		myRes.setInt("insertFPMLResponse", 0);
		message.setDataObject("insertFPMLDocResult", myRes);
		input1.setDataObject("body", message);
		return input1;
	}
			
	// Read the file into a string.
	try {
		char [] cbuf = new char[1024];
		FileReader xmlReader = new FileReader(xmlFileObj);
		int num=0;
		do {
			num = xmlReader.read(cbuf, 0, 1024);
			if (num > 0)
				xmlText += new String(cbuf, 0, num);
		} while (num != -1);
	}
	catch (Exception ex) {
		ex.printStackTrace();
	}
		
	// Pass the document string as the document parameter
	insertXMLObject.setString("document", xmlText);
	// Use the file name as a comment
	insertXMLObject.setString("comment", fileName);
	System.out.println("invoke FPML service ");
		
	// invoke the web service
DataObject insertXMLResponse =
 invokeWebService("theSoapPortTypePartner",
			"insert", insertXMLObject);
		
	// return the int value response
	if (insertXMLResponse != null)
myRes.setInt("insertFPMLResponse", 
insertXMLResponse.getInt("return"));
	else
		myRes.setInt("insertFPMLResponse", 0);
	message.setDataObject("insertFPMLDocResult", myRes);

	input1.setDataObject("body", message);
	System.out.println("leaving Response");

	return input1;
}

private DataObject invokeWebService(String servicePartner,
	String serviceMethod, DataObject params) {
	try {
		Service myService = (Service) ServiceManager.INSTANCE
			.locateService(servicePartner);
		System.out.println("Invoke Webservice/+" + serviceMethod);
	DataObject response = (DataObject)
myService.invoke(serviceMethod, params);
		return response;
	} catch (Exception ex) {
		return null;
	}
}
  1. In the .java source code, right click and select Source -> Organize Imports to add the required imports. If a pop up window is displayed for the File class type, make sure to select java.io.File from the list.
Figure 38. Organize Imports
Figure 38. Organize Imports
  1. Save your work.

The InsertFPML module is complete. Now it is time to deploy and test the module.


Deploy the module

In the Servers tab, make sure the WebSphere Process Server is running. Right click on the WebSphere Process Server and select Add and Remove Projects. Select InsertFPMLApp and add to the configured projects list. Click Finish.

Figure 39. Deploy InsertFPMLApp
Figure 39. Deploy InsertFPMLApp

Sample .xml file:

The input for the module should be a fully qualified .xml file name. The file should contain well formed .xml. For test purposes, the following .xml text can be cut and pasted into a file. Make sure the file type is .xml. Save the file locally. For this example, the file name is c:\temp\sample.xml.

<sample>Hello world</sample>

Test the module

Check the Servers tab to make sure the WebSphere Process Server is running. Right click in the Assembly Diagram and select Test Module from the drop down menu. In the Initial request parameters section, type in the fully qualified .xml file name to be inserted in the Value field and press Continue to run the module. Figure 40 shows these steps:

Figure 40. InsertFPML test
Figure 40. InsertFPML Test

Select WebSphere Process Server v6.0 in the pop up window and click Finish. As shown below:

Figure 41. Select deployment location
Figure 41. Select deployment location

When the test is complete and the document is successfully inserted, you see the output in Figure 42. Notice the insertFPMLResponse return parameter from the interface you created. The "1" value indicates a successful DB2 insertion.

It is important to note that the code uses the file name as the comment. The alphaWorks Web service insert operation requires the comment to be unique. Once a file is successfully inserted, the insert operation fails. When testing this module, verify that a file does not already exist in the alphaWorks database with the same path name. Be sure to specify a new path name for subsequent iterations each time the operation is successful. Another option would be to change the following line in the .java code to generate a unique comment:

insertXMLObject.setString("comment", fileName);

Figure 42. InsertFPML response
Figure 42. InsertFPML response

Modifying this Example to Retrieve XML Documents

This tutorial can be easily modified to use the alphaWorks getDocumentByKey operation to retrieve an .xml document. This operation requires a string document id as input and returns the text of the document as a string. The following screen shot displays the modified GetFPMLInterface file from the Export component, created in the Define the Module Interface section of this document.

Figure 43. GetFPMLInterface for GetFPML module
Figure 43. GetFPMLInterface for GetFPML module

In the Create the mediation flow section of the tutorial, connect the getFPMLDocument source operation to the alphaWorks getDocumentByKey target operation, as shown in Figure 44.

Figure 44. GetFPML module operation Connection
Figure 44. GetFPML module operation Connection

In the Create the Java Component section of this tutorial, replace the mediate( ) method and add the invokeWebService( ) method from the following code. In this example, the module name is GetFPML and the name of the interface is GetFPMLInterface. The operation name and parameters are as described in Figure 43 above. Changes to these naming conventions requires changes to the code below.

Listing 3. GetFPML Java mediation code
public DataObject mediate(DataObject input1) {

	String docId = input1.getString("body/getFPMLDocument/id");
	System.out.println("In Response Mediation");

	ServiceManager serviceManager = ServiceManager.INSTANCE;
	BOFactory bofactory = (BOFactory) serviceManager
		.locateService("com/ibm/websphere/bo/BOFactory");

	DataObject getDocumentByKeyObj = bofactory.createByElement(
"http://schemas.ibm.com/fpml/fpml/fpml.dadx", "getDocumentByKey");
		
getDocumentByKeyObj.setString("id", 
input1.getString("body/getFPMLDocument/id"));
	System.out.println("invoke FPML service ");
DataObject objResponse = 
invokeWebService("theSoapPortTypePartner",
			"getDocumentByKey", getDocumentByKeyObj);

	DataObject getDocumentByKeyObjResponseOutPut = objResponse
		.getDataObject("return");
DataObject resultObj = 
getDocumentByKeyObjResponseOutPut
.getDataObject("getDocumentByKeyResult");
	List rowObj = resultObj.getList("getDocumentByKeyRow");
	DataObject docObj = (DataObject) rowObj.get(0);
	String docStr = docObj.getString("dOC");
			
	DataObject message = bofactory.createByMessage(
		"http://GetFPML/GetFPMLInterface",
			"getFPMLDocumentResponseMsg");
	DataObject myRes = bofactory.createByElement(
		"http://GetFPML/GetFPMLInterface",
			"getFPMLDocumentResponse");
	myRes.setString("xmlDoc", docStr);

	message.setDataObject("getFPMLDocumentResult", myRes);

	input1.setDataObject("body", message);
	System.out.println("leaving Response");

	return input1;
}

private DataObject invokeWebService(String servicePartner,
	String serviceMethod, DataObject params) {
	System.out.println("Getting  the service for invocation for +"
		+ servicePartner);
	Service myService = (Service) ServiceManager.INSTANCE
		.locateService(servicePartner);
	System.out.println("Invoke Webservice/+" + serviceMethod);
	DataObject response = (DataObject) 
myService.invoke(serviceMethod, params);
	return response;
}

Test GetFPML module

To test the GetFPML mediation module, a document id string is required. For this tutorial, the id 21 is used. This is the id for one of the sample documents in the alphaWorks FpML database. To see a list of all valid document ids, click on this link and invoke the getPrimaryKeys method. Figure 45 shows the GetFPML test:

Figure 45. GetFPML test
Figure 45. GetFPML test

The document string is returned in the xmlDoc parameter, as shown below:

Figure 46. GetFPML response
Figure 46. GetFPML response

Conclusion

This tutorial shows you how to how to build, deploy and test a WebSphere Integration Developer mediation module that invokes a Web service. This tutorial also instructs you in how to modify the example to retrieve XML documents. This example uses the Web services provided by the alphaWorks FpML DB2 pureXML ™ Demo page.

From the step-by-step instructions in this tutorial, you should have the confidence to build, deploy and test your own mediation module.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Cindy Saracco, Susan Malaika, Andre Tost and Mohab El-Hilaly for their help with this tutorial.

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static.content.url=http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/js/artrating/
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Zone=Information Management, SOA and web services, WebSphere, XML
ArticleID=256808
ArticleTitle=Exposing DB2 Version 9 pureXML using WebSphere Integration Developer
publish-date=09202007